Venture Coolers are like the camping version of OtterBox phone cases

first_imgIf you’re going camping this summer, there’s a decent chance your phone will be protected inside an OtterBox case. The same may be true for your lunch, as it turns out. OtterBox has taken the wraps off its new Venture Coolers, a lineup of rugged boxes designed for holding food and ice rather than gadgets. The coolers are being offered in three different sizes and include things like an integrated cutting board, organization slots, and various durable accessories, among other things. Story Timelineolloclip 4-in-1 lens lands on the new OtterBox uniVERSE case systemGoal Zero Nomad Folio joins OtterBox uniVERSE case systemOtterBox’s new accessories line includes earbuds and chargers OtterBox accessories line includes earbuds and chargersOtterBox is perhaps best known for its ultra-durable phone cases, but it has also dabbled in the world of durable boxes, and the new Venture Coolers are no exception. These models are designed for serious outdoorsy folks who want to head out into the hot, harsh wilderness without sacrificing their cold beverages and fresh foods. center_img Unlike many coolers, though, the OtterBox Ventures takes things to the next level with built-in tools and more. The Venture Coolers can preserve ice for up to two weeks straight, no doubt depending on how often the cooler is opened. It also contains clips and mounting points for attaching accessories, as shown in the video above. A small OtterBox case can be attached to the back of the cooler; included cutting board and cup holders can be removed from inside the cooler and mounted on the outside, as well. There’s also a dry storage board.The coolers are available in Venture 25/45/65 sizes, the smallest of which (the 25) being priced at $249.99 USD. The Venture 45 is priced at $349.99 and the Venture 65 is priced at $399.99 USD. As well, the coolers are being offered in three different color schemes: white and blue called Hudson, tan and green called Ridgeline, and Realtree Xtra camo called Back Trail.SOURCE: OtterBoxlast_img read more

Amazon Alexa now controls your DISH DVR by voice

first_imgStory TimelineAmazon’s Echo Look gives Alexa fashion-judging eyesAmazon Echo Show gives Alexa a screen and free video callsWith “Amazon Fire TV Edition”, 4K TVs now come with AlexaGoogle Home understands accents better than Siri, Alexa DISH is looking to end “where’s the remote?” hunting with an update for its Hopper and Wally set-top boxes that adds Amazon Alexa support. The new feature works with Amazon’s Echo, Echo Dot, and Amazon Tap, with voice control for everything from navigating between channels, search, and the basics of pause, fast-forward, and rewind. It’s the first official integration of this sort between Alexa, Amazon’s virtual assistant, and a third-party TV provider’s hardware. Other platforms, like Comcast’s Xfinity, do offer voice control natively. Back in 2015, Comcast offered a special remote with a microphone built-in that could be used to search for channels and control playback. Meanwhile Amazon’s own Fire TV has Alexa support, while Apple’s fourth-generation Apple TV has a Siri-powered remote. Rather than go the home-grown route, DISH has instead opted to integrate with one of the rising stars in the third-party marketplace. You can connect the two by heading into the Alexa app and finding the DISH TV skill under the “Music, Video & Books” category. Then, you can get an Alexa code from the internet-connected Hopper or Wally set-top box. Once activated, you choose the desired Hopper or Wally receiver from the list of discoverable devices in the Alexa app. At that point, by using the “Alexa” wake-word you can instruct the smart speaker to do a wide variety of commands:“Alexa, change channel to ESPN”“Alexa, tune to channel 130”“Alexa, go to the History Channel”“Alexa, find the Big Bang Theory”“Alexa, search for Game of Thrones”“Alexa, show me Tom Hanks movies”“Alexa, search for comedies”“Alexa, play This is Us”“Alexa, skip forward”“Alexa, rewind 30 seconds”“Alexa, pause”“Alexa, resume”In fact, you’ll be able to navigate, play, pause, fast-forward, rewind, and search content, the latter based on channel, title, actor, or genre. As well as DISH’s live, recorded, and on-demand streaming content, the universal search will also work with Netflix’s catalog. DISH says that there are more commands and integrations in the pipeline, too. That could mean the ability to program recordings using voice, perhaps, or manage a list of DVR-recorded shows. Of course, the big challenge might be preventing living room arguments. The good thing – and frustrating thing – about having a traditional remote control is that only one person can use it at a time. With Alexa listening from across the room, and responding to any voice, heated debates about what should be playing could end up escalating into a battle of raised voices. last_img read more

Bitcoin price today Stock up but keep it secret BTC USD

first_imgThis morning the price of Bitcoin VS USD is lower than it’s likely set to be over the next few days. As such, it’s a good time to trade your dollars for all the satoshi* you can hold. The big problem with what you’re about to do isn’t the cash exchange, it’s the taxation of said investments that might end up being applied retroactively in the near future. Story TimelineApple pulls Blockchain Bitcoin wallet from App StoreThis Blockchain phone is unreal: Sirin Labs, Solarin, and FINNEYBitcoin goes mainstream with futures trading on Wall StreetBitcoin price down today: Here’s whyOpera bitcoin mining protection feature arrives in next update Do I pay taxes on Bitcoin?Whether you buy one full Bitcoin or a smallest fraction of a Bitcoin (one satoshi,) there’s a good chance you’ve got a potential for taxation. If you’re the sort of person that reports every monetary transaction to the Federal Government as you’re supposed to, you’ll want to tell them you’ve dropped some cash on Bitcoin, too. The potential for an audit if you fail to report an investment like this is real.*DID YOU KNOW: You can buy a fraction of a bitcoin: Satoshi!The idea still up for debate is whether trading USD for Bitcoin is an investment, or simply an exchange of funds. If you plan on trading massive amounts of cash for Bitcoin, the risk might just be too great to consider. The risk, that is, of finding yourself on the wrong side of the IRS.OF IMPORTANT NOTE: Nothing above or below should be considered legal advice, tax advice, or investment advice. Anything you do before, during, or after reading this article is entirely of your own accord, and most certainly none of the business of the author or SlashGear. Be cautious, be safe, and be smart!VPN TimeIf you’re extremely, particularly fearful of any 3rd-party entity seeing your Bitcoin business, you’ll want to work with a VPN. Connecting to the web through your standard internet provider without a VPN includes the possibility that your website visits and actions are being tracked. It sucks, but it’s true.If you use a VPN, there’s a greater chance that your actions and website visits will be private. Privatizing your wi-fi connection, using a VPN, and connecting with TOR might be your best combo at home, barring using the internet connection of some trusted, wired network other than your own. Even if you have all of these secure measures in place, there’s still a chance your Bitcoin investment might be seen – sort of. Bank Account InvestmentIf you use a service like Coinbase, you’ll likely move money from your bank account to your Coinbase wallet, then trade it for Bitcoin. This in itself might not be enough evidence that you’ve made some sort of investment that needs to be taxed – but then again, it might. There are other ways to buy Bitcoin – and other, multiple services which you can use to make your USD turn into Bitcoin without direct connection to your bank account. I’m not going to link you to those services here, not least of all because I’ve only tried a couple, and I don’t trust any service implicitly.Cash OutJust as important as keeping your trade of USD to BTC private is the privacy of BTC to USD. If you ever plan on going back to USD, that is to say. You might just want to keep Bitcoin for the rest of your life, up unto the point at which digital currencies are the only currencies on this planet worth working with. If that time ever comes!last_img read more

Facebook vows to use 100 renewable energy by 2020

first_imgFacebook has vowed to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 75-percent with an ultimate goal of switching entirely to renewable energy by the end of 2020. The company has worked on reaching various renewable and clean energy goals over the years, having signed contracts for more than 3 gigawatts of solar and wind energy since 2013. Over the last year, Facebook has added more than 2500 megawatts to its renewable energy contracts, saying in a statement today that it has no plans of slowing down. In 2015, Facebook had a stated goal of covering 50-percent of its facilities with renewable energy by this year; it reached 51-percent last year, exceeding its goal.Facebook is focusing on new solar and wind projects that are on the same grid as its data centers. The idea here is that Facebook’s investment helps support jobs in the communities where it operates. As well, Facebook says its efforts help “move energy markets forward,” doing so by giving other companies access to renewable energy via opening projects to them, as well as building infrastructure. Assuming everything goes according to plan, Facebook’s operations around the world will be covered entirely by renewable energy within the next two years.AdChoices广告Facebook’s goal joins similarly stated plans by other major tech companies, including Google and Microsoft. Earlier this year, Microsoft announced that it had entered into the US’s largest corporate solar power deal as part of its own ongoing efforts.SOURCE: Facebooklast_img read more

Toyota sells over 3000 Mirai hydrogenpowered vehicles in California

first_imgToyota’s Mirai is a four-door mid-size sedan that produces zero emissions. It has an EPA estimated driving range of 312 miles and gets 67 mpge city/highway/combined. The Mirai performs on par with traditional gas-powered vehicles according to Toyota, but the Mirai uses no gas.The refueling time of the hydrogen vehicles about five minutes. The hydrogen creates electricity using oxygen and a fuel cell and the only byproduct emitted during that conversion process is water vapor. Toyota also notes that it is committed to building a hydrogen refueling network.For now, California is one of the only places where you can refuel a hydrogen-powered car, which is why the vehicle is only sold in California. Air Liquide and Toyota are working together to set up a network of 12 additional hydrogen fueling stations that will stretch from New York to Boston to expand the availability and appeal of the Mirai.Toyota is also working on a new hydrogen production facility at the Port of Long Beach that will use bio-waste from the agriculture industry in California to generate water, electricity, and hydrogen. That hydrogen will power Toyota fuel cell vehicles that are moving through the port. SOURCE: Toyota Toyota has announced that it has reached a milestone with the Mirai hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The car has passed over 3,000 units sold in California. That number means that the Mirai makes up over 80% of all hydrogen fuel cell vehicles on the roads in the US.last_img read more

Tesla Model Y livestream How to watch Elon Musks big EV reveal

first_imgEverything has been building up to Model YAfter several years and with numerous cars under its belt, it’s easy to get blasé about what Tesla has achieved. The Model Y, though, will catapult the California automaker into the midst of the fiercest category in the car space today. Crossovers and small SUVs are perennial best-sellers these days, and you need to bring your A-game if you want to succeed. In Tesla’s case, that’ll require great packaging, pricing, and production. The “production hell” of the Model 3 has hopefully given the automaker enough lessons when it comes to figuring out how to produce an electric car for the mass market. Similarly, by now it should have an angle on how to deliver premium features – including advanced driver-assistance technology like Autopilot and Autopark – without forcing buyers to break the bank. We’re expecting a bigger car than Model 3With the Model Y set to build on the success – and the design – of the Model 3, it’s no surprise that the two cars will share a common design language. Tesla has been coy with pre-announcement images of its new EV, unsurprisingly. Still, from what we’ve seen so far, it certainly appears like the Model Y will look a little like a Model 3 that has been stretched upwards. That’s going to give it a distinct look on the road, much as the Model X distinguishes itself from the Model S. However it should also improve on factors like ride height and clearance. Model Y drivers may not have off-roading in mind, but the ability to go down rutted roads – potentially while towing – without worrying about catching the underbody could be a huge advantage. More than that, though, is the psychological impact. Crossovers and SUVs are a huge category right now, comfortably out-selling sedans and other body styles. Key to that is the feeling drivers have when they’re at the wheel: higher up in traffic, generally with better visibility, and the perception that, should the worst happen and they be in a crash, their car will handle it better.Tesla has some big Model Y questions to answerDespite what we know already, there are still plenty of gaps that Tesla needs to fill in today at the Model Y reveal. Style is just one of those: arguably more important are factors like price, range, and performance. We already have a rough idea how much the Model Y will cost. Elon Musk described the crossover as being around 10-percent bigger than the Model 3, and carrying a similar price premium. That would suggest the Model Y will start at around $39,000 before any incentives or other savings.As we’ve seen before, though, the cheapest Tesla isn’t necessarily the first to go on sale. As with the Model 3, the $35k version of which arrived a long time after more expensive trims of the car were available to order, we’d expect Model Y buyers to be nudged toward the higher-spec versions initially. Tesla may not be too forthcoming on how soon, exactly, the cheapest Model Y will go on sale – after all, that might dampen sales of more premium trims, even if the automaker could put a solid date on it – but we’ll be listening closely for an idea on timescales. How much will those more expensive versions cost? Again, looking at the current Model 3, a $52,000 starting price for the top-spec trim seems likely. That will presumably come with all-wheel drive, the premium interior, and the longest range. The entry-level Model Y, meanwhile, is likely to be rear-wheel drive and have the shortest range. Musk previously said that, as a bigger and heavier car, it won’t go as far on the same battery size as a Model 3, but we’d still be surprised if the Model Y’s starting range dropped below the 200 mile mark. That’s an important psychological barrier, after all. Tesla Model Y livestreamExcited? You probably should be. The big Tesla reveal kicks off at 8pm PDT, and the automaker will be live-streaming the whole thing at livestream.Tesla.com. Expect Elon Musk to make some big promises as he tackles all the questions investors and potential customers have about this new challenge. SlashGear will be at the event in LA, and we’ll be bringing you all the details as well as some first-impressions as the launch goes down. Join us this evening as we get our first look at what’s shaping up to be Tesla’s most important car to-date! Story TimelineTesla sales go online-only amid huge test drive changeTesla Model Y will finally be unveiled next weekTesla changes plans and will keep more stores open Tesla is about to take the wraps off the Model Y, and the electric car company has shared another teaser image to fully whet appetites ahead of today’s big reveal. The fourth car in Tesla’s current line-up will arguably be its most important: a compact SUV to target one of the most popular segments in the automotive market today. last_img read more

Poor People In At Least 21 States To Face Medicaid Coverage Gap

first_imgMcClatchy reports that in most states opting against the health law’s Medicaid expansion, millions will be stranded without insurance:  They will make too much to qualify for Medicaid, but too little to get subsidies to help buy coverage on the new insurance marketplaces. Other news organizations report on the Michigan Senate’s decision to move ahead with expansion, but not until April, and on the continuing debate in Ohio.McClatchy Medicaid ‘Coverage Gap’ Looming For The Poor In 21 States The law was supposed to provide health insurance for most Americans next year by expanding Medicaid in all states to people earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. That’s about $15,900 for an individual in 2013, or nearly $32,500 for a family of four. But when the Supreme Court ruled that states could opt out of the expansion, Republican-led states took advantage. Rather than expand their Medicaid programs, most kept their programs as is – open mainly to the poorest of the poor (Pugh, 8/28).Detroit Free Press: Delay In Medicaid Expansion To Be CostlyGetting the expansion of Medicaid passed in the state Senate Tuesday night was a huge victory for Gov. Rick Snyder, state health officials and, ultimately, nearly 500,000 low-income Michiganders. But the failure of the Senate to vote to give the bill immediate effect, thus delaying the implementation of the law until April 1, could cost the state and individuals hoping to qualify for Medicaid coverage dearly (Gray, 8/29).Stateline: Michigan Senate Narrowly Passes Medicaid ExpansionThe Michigan Senate narrowly voted in favor of expanding Medicaid eligibility Tuesday night, extending Medicaid benefits to an additional 345,000 residents (according to the Kaiser Family Foundation and The Urban Institute) now without health insurance. The measure is expected to be approved by the House in early September and signed by Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who lobbied forcefully for expansion. Under the legislation, beneficiaries would be required to pay a portion of their premiums (Ollove, 8/28).Columbus Dispatch: Citing Depression, Maurice Clarett Joins Call To Boost MedicaidMental health advocates gathered at the Statehouse today to push for Medicaid expansion in Ohio. Among the supporters? Former Ohio State phenom running back Maurice Clarett. Clarett, part of the 2002 National Championship team, had numerous off-the-field troubles, including robbery and weapons convictions that put him in prison. He has since been treated for depression (Felser, 8/29). Poor People In At Least 21 States To Face Medicaid Coverage Gap This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

Exodus Of Democrats Health Care Crusaders In Congress

first_img Last week, the Department of Health and Human Services welcomed its third group of “entrepreneurs-in-residence” — mainly private-sector tech experts and start-up founders who are spending a year advising the agency on its health IT projects. Two are working on data collection and analysis. Paula Braun, a data scientist with Charlottesville, Va.-based consulting firm Elder Research, is embedded in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to devise a better Electronic Death Registration System, so that the CDC can refine its analytics and predictive modeling. (Ravindranath, 12/7) North Carolina’s rates for individual insurance vary significantly across the state and are among the highest in the nation. The state’s high insurance costs have been blamed on a grab bag of causes, including entrenched market dominance by Blue Cross, the state’s decision last year not to expand Medicaid, and a decades-long race among hospital companies to build one of the nation’s best health care networks. The Affordable Care Act has been blamed and credited for lots of things, but one of the legacies of the federal health law is greater transparency for insurance costs, which for years had been treated as a closely guarded secret. Today anyone with Internet access can get on healthcare.gov and compare rates within their own state or with other states. (Murawski and Raynor, 12/7) A Supreme Court challenge that poses a grave threat to President Obama’s health care law had its genesis precisely four years ago as a power-point presentation by a self-proclaimed pessimist from South Carolina. The idea was picked up by an Ohio law professor, given a policy and public relations push by a Washington health economist and turned into a lawsuit by an Oklahoma attorney general. Three more lawsuits followed. Nearly five years after the law was passed, their effort has reached the Supreme Court, which saved the president’s signature domestic policy achievement in 2012 but now could deal Obama a significant setback. (Wolf, 12/7) And USA Today traces the origins of the latest Supreme Court challenge to the law – The Sacramento Bee: With Affordable Care Act, Fewer Uninsured In California Emergency Rooms USA Today: Pessimist’s Persistence Could Pay Off Against Obamacare At 61, Ken Helms of Charlotte would love to have health insurance. Based on what he earned directing traffic this year, he’s eligible for federal help paying premiums and out-of-pocket costs under the Affordable Care Act. But he worried that his unpredictable income could leave him in the lurch. The subsidies are designed to provide more help to those with smaller paychecks. But in North Carolina, the floor drops out when a wage-earner falls below the poverty level, a distinct possibility for Helms.His fear: Getting health insurance – and long-delayed care – could leave him worse off if he loses his coverage and has to repay Uncle Sam. Experts say that won’t happen, but his trepidation is understandable. People who rely on tips, commissions or jobs with variable hours can have a tough time predicting annual income, which is the basis for ACA subsidies. In a recent Federal Reserve survey, almost one-third of Americans said their income fluctuates from month to month. (Helms, 12/7) What happens when you break a leg and you live hundreds of miles from the nearest hospital? Or when you can’t afford to get a new pair of glasses because you don’t have health insurance? For many, the answer is to go without help. That’s why the organization Remote Area Medical was conceived. As we’ve reported before, the team travels across the United States and abroad to provide health care to those in need. That’s a lot of people — about 16 percent of Americans are uninsured, according to the latest Gallup poll. (Bruzek, 12/5) Fewer uninsured Californians are seeking treatment in the state’s emergency rooms, a decline that experts say is a direct result of the federal Affordable Care Act. The trend represents welcome news for previously uninsured patients who had trouble affording a trip to the emergency room. But it has not brought down ER treatment costs for everyone else, health care experts said, nor has it slowed a years-long increase in overall emergency room traffic. (Reese, 12/6) Who will be the new health care leaders for Democrats? Sens. Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Ben Cardin of Maryland want more delivery system reforms. Sen. Patty Murray of Washington wants better contraceptive coverage and more doctors. All three want to beef up mental health coverage. And Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon and Rep. Frank Pallone of New Jersey aren’t even saying what’s on their agenda — they want the Republicans to go first. It’s all smaller bore stuff — a real comedown from the visions of the past. (Nather, 12/7) center_img The Washington Post: HHS Adds New Class Of ‘Entrepreneurs-In-Residence’ The Charlotte Observer: In NC, Health Insurance Rates Vary Widely, Depending On Location The Charlotte Observer: For Working Poor In North Carolina, Income Drop Creates Health Care Fear This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Politico: Health Care Torch Passed … To Nobody Exodus Of Democrats’ Health Care Crusaders In Congress Politico looks at the generational upheaval among congressional Democrats as a new Republican Congress takes over in January. Other stories examine how the Health and Human Services Department has “entrepreneurs-in-residence” advising on health IT projects and how the working poor in North Carolina who rely on tips, commissions or jobs with variable hours can have a tough time predicting annual income to qualify for insurance subsidies. Meanwhile, media outlets look at the decline in uninsured Californians in emergency rooms and the release of a documentary, Remote Area Medical, which follows a team of doctors, dentists and nurses as they treat thousands of people in Tennessee  – NPR: Delivering Health Care To The Uninsured For $15 A Pop last_img read more

WatchOS 6 New faces audiobooks and the App Store are coming to

first_img6. App StoreYou’ll soon be able to access the App Store directly from your Apple Watch; downloading, purchasing and installing apps without the need to use your iPhone. Not only will it be easier to access useful apps but it also means that apps can be run fully on the watch, which is a great opportunity for developers to design more bespoke experiences for your wrist.7. Activity TrendsSmarter analysis of your physical activity will compare nine key metrics based on your recent activity. It tracks progress by comparing your activity from the last 90 days to the last 365 days, presenting you with a more in-depth, long-term view of your physical fitness.8. Hearing HealthAs part of the expanded focus on health (beyond mere heart-rate tracking), your watch can now inform you if you’re listening to music too loudly or if you’re in a noisy environment that could damage your hearing in the long-term. Sadly, some Apple fans at the event missed this announcement, as they had their AirPods in.9. Streaming AudioIn another move towards independence from the iPhone, apps can now directly stream audio from your Apple Watch. We’re looking forward to seeing how app developers take advantage of this latest tweak to the Apple ecosystem.Related: Is your Apple Watch compatible with watchOS 6?10. Taptic ChimesNow your Watch can buzz and make a sound (such as birdsong) on the hour. Frankly, this feature sounds more annoying than helpful. All I’m saying is, be prepared to face down even more misanthropic stares at 8am on your morning commute if you choose to broadcast birdsong from your wrist. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. WWDC 2019 – Apple’s annual developer conference – presented us with tons of new tidbits surrounding the forthcoming release of iOS 13, macOS Catalina and watchOS 6 (alongside the launch of a new Mac Pro and the heart-stoppingly pricey Pro Display XDR).As a result, we’ve now got a bevvy of new features bound for our wrists to look forward to. Apple CEO, Tim Cook promised that these new features will make the Apple Watch “an even more indispensable part of your daily life” — but is that just hype, or is there real cause to be excited? Here’s the full breakdown of the biggest changes and additions.Related: iOS 131. New Watch FacesThe latest operating system brings many more new watch faces, making your Apple Watch far more customisable. Examples shown on stage included ‘California’, which sports a traditional look with customisable backdrop colours and numerals, as well as the option to view as a full-screen face or a circular face – similar to the existing Infograph face.‘Gradient’ is a minimalist analogue face with a backdrop that can be set to almost any colour. You can choose the gradient’s start point and whether it displays as a full-screen or circular face.The existing ‘Numerals’ face now comes in two new variations: ‘Numerals Mono’ and ‘Numerals Duo’. Mono shows only the hour, with analogue hands overlaid on top, while Duo is a digital face with hours and minutes. You can customise the colour and style of the numbers shown too.Lastly, Apple showed off its new ‘Solar’ face, which features an animated backdrop that follows the position of the sun based on time of day – you can also view a fast-forwarded version of the animation by twisting the digital crown.2. Voice MemosNow, with the press of a new watch face complication, you can record voice memos by speaking straight into your wrist. This should make on-the-go organisation a whole lot more straightforward. You can also use the recording tech to send voice messages (such as nagging your children, if the keynote example is anything to go by).Related: iPadOS features3. CalculatorThere’s a new calculator app accessible directly on your Apple Watch. Well overdue but not particularly exciting, you may think. However, one particularly handy feature was highlighted during the demo — it allows you to conveniently calculate tips and bill-splitting fairly among your mates. Anything that spares you from torturous mental arithmetic after an evening out must be a good idea (still no calculator app for the iPad though).4. Cycle TrackingA new mode for women’s health named Cycle Tracking (attached to the existing Health app) is headed to watchOS. This allows women to record details of their menstrual cycle and it can also be used to indicate fertile windows for more informed family planning. Helpfully, it will also be fully available on iPhone too, so you don’t require an Apple Watch to access this new feature.5. AudiobooksA new app for audiobooks makes its way onto watchOS and you won’t need your iPhone to run it. You can play them directly from your wrist to your Bluetooth headphones (AirPods, presumably) so that you can listen to a racy story on your run, even when you don’t have your iPhone to hand.The real genius comes with the integration between watchOS’ audiobooks app and Apple Books. Titles in your ‘Reading Now’ list will automatically synchronise with your Apple Watch, letting you pick up from where you left off with a tap of the chosen book’s cover.Related: Best Apple Watch 2019 We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.center_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

VW Group Our Electric Car Investment Is OneThird Of Total

More VW EV News Fortunately, Philipp von Hagen – executive board member of Porsche SE – was on hand at today’s BloombergNEF San Francisco Summit to share his take on EVs. Von Hagen was asked if Porsche SE (and therefore VW) is “all in” on electrification? He replied, “Not really.”Yes, Volkswagen has committed to $50 billion in electric cars, autonomous driving, and mobility services by 2024. But what von Hagen revealed – and I have not heard before – is what the $50 billion figure represents. It’s only one-third of the company’s investment powertrain technologies in the next five years. He said, “The investment is big and consequential, but we still are making two-thirds of our investment in existing drivetrain technologies.”That’s fascinating. We hear all the time about the number of billions of dollars that one company or another is making in electrification, but automakers are always investing significant sums in technology. You almost never hear what percentage of the investment is going to EVs and other emerging technologies.You also hear about the number of models that are going electric. Von Hagen said that we could see 50 EVs from Porsche SE and its brands by the end of 2030. But keep in mind that the company makes 300 models, according to von Hagen.When asked about the risks that VW faces in making its investment in electrification, he put the onus on consumers. “I’m a great believer in how electrification improves the vehicles offered to consumers,” he said. “But will people buy electric vehicles?” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 4, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Volkswagen Group Reports Rising EV, PHEV Sales Mysterious VW EV Mule Spied Testing Statement comes from VW’s financial parent company, but you get the idea.The company entity known as Porsche SE is not a carmaker. It’s the financial holding company that owns the Volkswagen Group and all its brands, including Audi and Porsche. So it matters a lot what Porsche SE thinks about electrification. Source: Electric Vehicle News Spied: Volkswagen I.D. Crozz Mule Based On Tiguan read more

France turn to experienced heads for Cardiff decider

first_img … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. William Fotheringham France’s coach, Marc Lièvremont, having used this year’s Six Nations as a testbed for emerging young players, has largely abandoned the policy for Saturday’s tournament decider against Wales in Cardiff. With France needing to win by a clear 20 points to take the championship, Lièvremont’s team will be predominantly seasoned campaigners with only three youngsters included.At scrum-half, Jean-Baptiste Elissalde returns after an ankle injury, while David Skrela is recalled at fly-half, with a third place-kicker in Dimitri Yachvili on the bench. The hard-tackling flanker Thierry Dusautoir is also back, while among the backs Damien Traille is partnered at centre with Yannick Jauzion, as so often under Bernard Laporte, with Vincent Clerc reinstated on the wing.”We had decided before the game against Italy to look again at certain players who had been left out, such as Dusautoir, Clerc or Elissalde,” said Lièvremont. “Seeing what they have produced since the start of the tournament, it was only reasonable to bring them back for this last game. And as far as the team goes as a whole, we simply wished to put together the best team we could to win.”There are still decisions that will raise eyebrows, notably the selection of Fulgence Ouedraogo at No8 ahead of Elvis Vermeulen, who has been in fine form for his club Clermont-Auvergne. The 21-year-old from Montpellier got the nod, however, because his speed around the pitch is what Lièvremont believes he needs to counter the dynamic play the Welsh will produce on Saturday.Vermeulen, said Lièvremont, is likely to appear as an impact replacement late in the game. Another surprise was the absence of Cédric Heymans, whose partnership with Clerc on the wings was so influential against Scotland and Ireland. Instead, France will look to the pace of the young Clermont full-back Anthony Floch and his team-mate Julien Malzieu to complement Clerc.France, said Lièvremont, will start the game with the same plan as in their earlier games: to retain the ball and dictate the pace, even more important given the speed of the Welsh backs. “We always want to have the initiative, even if we haven’t always managed it perfectly. We will have to defend well to win the ball, but letting them run at us in a stadium where the atmosphere will be white-hot will be a sure way to defeat.”Italy’s coach, Nick Mallett, has made no changes to his side for Saturday’s wooden-spoon decider against Scotland in Rome. The flanker Alessandro Zanni will once again deputise for Mauro Bergamasco, who is unavailable through suspension.France (v Wales): Floch (Clermont-Auvergne); Clerc, Jauzion (both Toulouse), Traille (Biarritz), Malzieu (Clermont-Auvergne); Skrela (Stade Français), Elissalde (Toulouse); Barcella (Auch), Szarzewski (Stade Francais), Mas (Perpignan), Nallet (Castres, capt), Thion (Biarritz), Dusautoir (Toulouse), Ouedraogo (Montpellier), Bonnaire (Clermont-Auvergne). Replacements: Servat, Poux (both Toulouse), Mela (Albi), Vermeulen (Clermont-Auvergne), Yachvili (Biarritz), Trinh-Duc (Montpellier), Heymans (Toulouse).Italy: (v Scotland): Marcato (Treviso), Robertson (Viadana), Canale (Clermont-Auvergne), Mirco Bergamasco (Stade Français), Galon (Overmach Parma); Masi (Biarritz), Picone (Treviso); Lo Cicero (Racing Métro Paris), Ghiraldini (Calvisano), Castrogiovanni (Leicester Tigers), Del Fava (Ulster), Bortolami (Gloucester), Sole (Viadana), Zanni (Calvisano), Parisse (Stade Français). Replacements: Ongaro (Saracens), Nieto (Gloucester), Perugini (Toulouse), Erasmus (Viadana), Travagli (Overmach Parma), Patrizio (Padova), Sgarbi (Treviso). Share on Messenger Support The Guardian France rugby union team Six Nations Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn France turn to experienced heads for Cardiff decider Since you’re here… Share via Email Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook Sportcenter_img Six Nations rugby 2008 Share via Email Rugby union Topics Shares00 Share on Twitter Wales rugby union team Sport First published on Wed 12 Mar 2008 20.09 EDT Wed 12 Mar 2008 20.09 EDT Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Top clubs beat the crunch with loyalty and long deals

first_img Twitter Premier League Top clubs beat the crunch with loyalty and long deals 24 Sep 2008 12:34 David Conn Wooderbeen First published on Tue 23 Sep 2008 19.03 EDT howyouknowIhe? Reply Share on Twitter Facebook Comments 84 Reply 24 Sep 2008 18:31 Share … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Facebook Reply Report I’m not sure how accurate that steward’s story is but if it is true you have to wonder what genius at Borothought that share of 25,000 full price empty seats was better than a share of 25,000 reduced price seats.A major reason for the relatively low attendance at OT last night is that season ticket holders can opt out of buying the Carling Cup matches this season whereas last season they had no choice in the matter. I note that attendances elsewhere last night were very low. Only 28,000 turned up at Anfield and 8,000 at Stoke to name a couple. While the demand for Premier League games remians high it is abundantly clear that the Carling Cup is on its arse.As for City not filling the stadium, this is nothing new. The notion that they are super fans who follow their club through thin & thinner is a media myth as huge swathes of empty blue seats are visible at most City home games. Sunderland is also one of the poorest parts of the country but they dont seem to have too many problems filling the Stadium of Light so it cant all be down to economics. | Pick Back on topic Wooderbeen so your evidence that clubs filling their ground not being a problm is that the most people that have ever been to the City of Manchester stadium is 47,331 but not 48,000 the actual capacity. Meaning that there have always at least 669 empty seats. In fact the average gate last season was 42,077 meaning that there were on average almost 6000 empty seats per game (that is the stat for league attendances too, not the sherbert double dip cup – I like that – so the mean is even lower), and United beat citeh’s record attendance last night.Not that i wouldn’t like prices reduced, my purse strings are tight this year. Facebook Share | Pick | Pick Share on WhatsApp Twitter Despite banking meltdown, big crowds and TV money make the Premier League an industry that can cope Share 4 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 24 Sep 2008 15:38 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share Twitter Share Threads collapsed | Pick Share on Twitter | Pick Twitter 2 Report extraordinaryrvanp Report Reply 0 1 Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter All PKMUFC Reply Share on Facebook Ramalution windbag Wooderbeen Facebook Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Facebook BrazilBranch Is it just me, or is this new format putting everybody off posting comments.Slow, finickity and irritating.Anyway, to judge the financial resilience of the PL by looking at gates is of limited relevance.It all comes down to Sky.Sky needed football to get penetration of the market. They now have it.Now football needs Sky both to pay the wages and to generate the audience for the sponsors.If Sky massively reduces the TV contract, for business reasons or because Murdoch’s priorities are elesewhere, The PL will still have to accept it. Otherwise less money (BBC/ITV) or lower audiences (Santanta).Over-dependence on one income source is never a recipe for economic security. Share on LinkedIn Wha? 0 1 Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment 0 1 | Pick 24 Sep 2008 17:23 Reply The reason that there are gaps in the stands at AG is because some well-heeled morons (usually companies, I think) buy up season tickets and then choose not to come to the matches.Maybe they just really want the Members’ pack and don’t much care for the football, dunno, but it’s rather sad when you consider the massive waiting-list for the season tickets. Share on Twitter Report The loyalty of supporters should see clubs through these difficult financial times. Photograph: Tom Jenkins/Guardian Report With any luck, everyone will cancel their TV subscriptions to pay for fuel bills, so the next time the rights are up for grabs, Sky and Setanta will have gone bust, the Premier League will get a much-deserved drop in revenue, and the games will end up on ITV. Report 24 Sep 2008 18:21 Share on Twitter 100 Share on Facebook 24 Sep 2008 15:55 Share on Twitter As a by the by I work in Finance recruitment. When I worked in the UK and dealt with newly qualified accountants, do you know how many asked about the Deloitte Footballing Group?Fricking nearly every single one of them. Its only open to the best of the best. Its the most elite division in the whole of finance. All they do is snoop round football clubs,bask in corporate entertainment and publish one report a year whilst not asking to many questions about the accountsFootball is just to massive, Man U fans would be reduced to eating dung before they stop going to Old Trafford and appaluding Ronaldo for having an affair behind their back, like very sad cuckholded men. Facebook Premier League Facebook Close report comment form Reply Show 25 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Report Reply Share on Twitter To join you off topic, ersatz, but as a regular rugby league, very infrequent football watcher, the suspensions you hand out for foul play in football look completely mad to me. They are a (very bad) joke.Funny, really, because rugby league is a much more violent game than football, but you would get a season long suspension for deliberately breaking someones leg in Australian rugby league. Is breaking the attendance record for the ground not good enough, David?http://www.thestateofthegame.com extraordinaryrvanp Report pierrelemer Share GMcG Share Shares00 And another thing!Tonight was a very disappointing attendance at Old Trafford. 20,000 empty seats means that somebody isn’t thinking straight. The future of the club needs the future support to be able to attend these prices. I guess including the cup matches in the season tickets means that many are discouraged. These matches should be a fiver for anyone under 16, give the future generation a chance to see the future generation of players and GET THEM INTO THE MATCH-GOING HABIT!What a wasted chance. Somebody correct me if I’m wrong about the pricing etc though. Twitter 0 1 0 1 | Pick | Pick 0 1 24 Sep 2008 16:45 Stubborn Prophets of Doom Share on Facebook Tue 23 Sep 2008 19.03 EDT | Pick Share on Twitter Actually, never-mind. I misread BB’s post, I thought he meant that AG and Anfield don’t get filled.What i wrote still stands true, but…gah, whatever. Facebook whathappenednext 24 Sep 2008 17:54 I was at OT last night and paid £80 (on the day of game) for 2 tickets for me and my teenage son.I enquired with the steward why the tickets had not been reduced and apparently Utd wanted to slash admission price but Boro refused, as they get an equal share of the gate receipts.Why should the oppostion club have any say whatsoever in what the home club can charge…its well out of order.So, instead of having a full-house with say £25 max ticket price , we were left with swathes of empty seats.This will be the last time I ever will pay this much, especially for the sherbert dib-dab cup. Share on Twitter | Pick collapsed 1 Email (optional) | Pick Twitter Share on Facebook | Pick Report Share Reply Share on Facebook Report Share on Facebook Twitter 3 Twitter BB,I read it wrong. Twitter Reply Reply Share on Twitter 24 Sep 2008 11:58 | Pick 24 Sep 2008 7:36 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter Share Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Twitter | Pick Share via Email Ever since the Premier League boomed into life in 1992, fuelled by Sky’s millions, stubborn prophets of doom have warned it is a bubble that is bound to burst. More measured observers wondered if clubs would be particularly vulnerable to a recession, because in order to pay enormous wages to their blessed players they rely on millions of ordinary people paying £400 a year for their Sky packages, season tickets which have ballooned about 800% in 16 years, and sponsorship and corporate entertainment budgets which many companies have to cut in rocky times.Now, here it is: banking meltdown, and the prospect of a recession for which the outlook varies only in the depth of its grimness. But look at the attendances: the football public’s response to last week’s dire headlines gave a clue to how the game is likely to fare – at the top, clubs believe, perhaps surprisingly, that they will be safe, while lower down, they will have to be careful. At six of the 10 weekend Premier League matches there were capacity or almost full houses. These came at Chelsea, for Manchester United’s highly charged visit, Liverpool, West Ham, Tottenham Hotspur and newly promoted Hull City and West Bromwich Albion. Sunderland did not fill the 49,000 Stadium of Light seats but 38,388 people at a match against Middlesbrough hardly represents an exodus of fans in hard-pressed Wearside. Bolton Wanderers, with 6,000 seats empty despite Arsenal’s presence, illustrated the continuing struggle to raise Reebok crowds above 22,000, and Blackburn Rovers’ kids-for-a-quid deal for the game against Fulham helped to draw 19,398. That is 12,000 below Ewood Park’s capacity but Rovers’ chairman, John Williams, argues that 20,000 attendees in a town of 100,000 people demonstrates profound commitment, rather than a game losing its lustre.The most spectacular statement of optimism in the Premier League’s future was delivered in Manchester, where City’s 6-0 rampage against Portsmouth followed the takeover of the club by Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan. He issued a public letter headed “Dear fellow Manchester City fans”, in which he pledged to be a “long-term investor”, to nurture homegrown players “not just a team of all-stars” and to support City’s role “in Manchester and the community it represents”.The letter did not offer just warm words. “In cold business terms,” it said, “Premiership football is one of the best entertainment products in the world and we see this as a sound business investment.”That could hardly be clearer: Sheikh Mansour, of the Abu Dhabi royal family and chairman of the emirate’s International Petroleum Investment Company, does not see the Premier League as a bubble about to burst any time soon.Despite City suddenly becoming the world’s richest club and featuring Robinho in the line-up, there were still more than 7,000 empty seats at the City of Manchester Stadium for Sunday’s match, which was not broadcast on live TV. For all the petro-billions behind City, “Manchester and the community it represents” comprises some of the UK’s poorest people. Although 40,000 is, historically, a good crowd, City remain in the category of clubs needing to work to fill their ground. Across Manchester, last week’s bail-out of the stricken insurers AIG, United’s £14.125m-a-year shirt sponsor, was read by some as a powerful sign of the downturn hitting football, but United sent out a “business as usual” message. The club did not argue with marketing analysts who said United would easily find another sponsor if AIG did pull out, because a Manchester United footballer’s chest represents a glittering, global shop window for any company, even in this market.Many have noted the melting away of United’s season-ticket waiting list following the expansion of Old Trafford and serial price increases, but crowds so far, 75,512 against Newcastle and 74,944 for the Champions League tie with Villarreal, remain immense, up with the record numbers famously packed in cheaply during any previous “golden age”. All the other boxes are ticked at Old Trafford, including the corporate ones, which, according to a club spokesman, are 96% full for this season. In short, they are not worrying about a meltdown. At the other top clubs, Arsenal and Liverpool still have waiting lists for season tickets, and Chelsea, with adult prices this season between £650 and £1,150, are also sold out.Dan Jones, of the sports business group at Deloitte, believes Premier League football is less vulnerable than other industries, because of fans’ enduring loyalty, and because much of the clubs’ money is already secured. The record £2.7bn TV deal runs till 2010 and the clubs are confident that Sky’s competitors, for Sheikh Mansour’s coveted “entertainment product”, will trump that figure next time. “Season tickets are paid up until May, sponsorship deals are fairly long-term,” Jones points out, “so football clubs are actually more protected than other businesses who look at the current economic climate and wonder how they will be doing next month.”Clubs such as Blackburn, Bolton, West Bromwich Albion, Sunderland, Wigan and Middlesbrough did not need last week’s news from the City of London to tell them of difficult economic circumstances – they are surrounded by them. Williams is acutely aware that Blackburn and much of east Lancashire have never struggled out of long-term decline and says most Rovers fans are in lower income bands. “The A666 is not the King’s Road, and we have to be aware of the impact of any recession,” he says. Blackburn season tickets and corporate box sales are both slightly down this season and the club is working harder, as with Saturday’s “kids-for-a-quid” offer, to attract crowds match by match.West Bromwich Albion provide a ready preview of how clubs may react if recession does bite their fans – they can reduce prices. West Midlands’ traditional engineering economy has been grinding down for years, and Albion responded to promotion last season by cutting season ticket prices 11%, following 20% the previous season. That makes season tickets at The Hawthorns almost a third cheaper than when Albion were last in the Premier League. The result: full houses at all three home games so far. The demand is there. Much has been made of Albion starting the season without a sponsor, but the club’s finance director, Mark Jenkins, says they are confident: “Clearly companies are watching their budgets, but we are talking to two very attractive potential sponsors. However, we are not willing to under-sell our sponsorship and have a price below which we won’t go.”Below the gilded Premier League, clubs must battle harder to attract fans, sponsors and corporate customers, but Football League crowds are still at historically vast levels. Since football was cleaned up, reinvented and actively marketed following its Hillsborough nadir, a huge well of fan loyalty – gold dust for any business – has been amassed, and it looks durable, even in a recession.Of the economic downturn, one fan said last week: “Obviously, if people lose their jobs, some will have to give up going to the match if they need the money to feed their kids. Mind you,” he added, “I’m not one of them.”He may have been joking. Twitter Sportblog Share on Facebook Reply 24 Sep 2008 17:30 Support The Guardian joe5000 Facebook Share No one young supports their local team anymore. All choose 1 of the big 4 and buy the shirt and watch on telly. Maybe it will end up with just the big 4 playing each other every week. Report Share on Twitter ‘Ever since the Premier League boomed into life in 1992, fuelled by Sky’s millions,’Did it really ‘boom’ into life, David? … or had it been getting along very nicely, thank you, for around one hundred and four years under a different name? … and with substantially better attendance records?’Fuelled by Sky’s million’s’ … my ar$e. 25 Share on Twitter MarcelaProust Arsenal and Liverpool don’t even fill grounds now. Loading comments… Trouble loading? Twitter Share Football used to be a working class mans game. But as the years go on, less and less working class people can afford to go to every game like they used toToo many empty seats where business’s and general biffs buy season tickets and don’t go.Most clubs are more interested in satisfying their corporate fans than the real ones.No club should charge more than £25 for a game.center_img invain Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Reply Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook kingmarv34 Share 24 Sep 2008 10:13 Share Twitter 0 1 24 Sep 2008 13:34 0 1 Share Report Share What a peculiar article and from a writer I had always thought looked for the truth behind the hype. It’s a strange mix of the smug ‘World’s Best League’ rallying call of the Sky Sports commentator, the pseudo business speak of the Premier League suits and their ‘Product’ but surprisingly little interaction with the fans – neither the Sky subscription couch potatoes nor the actual match attendees. Yes, the supposed quote from a ‘fan’ this week (who, where, which team?) was a joke and I’ll tell you why: WIVES.He quotes some beancounter (albeit one from the Premier League of beancounters) – “Dan Jones, of the sports business group at Deloitte, believes Premier League football is less vulnerable than other industries, because of fans’ enduring loyalty,…………”Well erm…. yes. But surely we don’t yet know how that loyalty is going to stand up to increasing job losses and the cost of living along with the frankly scandalous prices being charged by some clubs. We may be moving into uncharted territory and it could be quite terrifying – particularly for the clubs. Twitter 0 1 Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter BernieZ Topics 24 Sep 2008 10:33 Share on Pinterest | Pick 24 Sep 2008 10:57 Hmmm. I like that. I also enjoyed the irony of the phrase being coined by one David Conn.Also, using Manchester City as an example of a club who must try harder to fill up its stadium based on the Chelsea game is laughable as it is annoying… Facebook 24 Sep 2008 16:52 24 Sep 2008 15:59 | Pick Order by oldest 0 1 Highest Official Attendance – 47,331 V Chelsea, 13/09/2008 (previous record – 47,321 v Liverpool, 30/12/2007; 47,304 V Chelsea, 28/2/2004) Reason (optional) 24 Sep 2008 9:18 Reuse this content,View all comments > 0 1 0 1 Facebook Report Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Not if it drops 7000 the next week against such minnows as the FA Cup winners. I always thought that City were about the best-supported team in the land for numbers and loyalty, home and away, perhaps along with Burnley. If they can’t be bothered to turn up to watch Robinho play, surely that signifies that there IS a problem developing with English football. After that 6-0 spanking, they’ll all be back for the next match, sure. Tis a sign though. The prices are too high to entice the casual fan for the occasional match when United or Chelsea aren’t the visitors. Arsenal and Liverpool don’t even fill grounds now.As for the rest, I don’t agree with David Conn. Doesn’t happen often. Give it a year of economic difficulties and Sky subscriptions will be the first to go for many families. You can justify a trip to the pub for the important matches only and still be saving money. You’ll have to choose the pub though – they too will be binning their digi dishes as the prices rise. It has been happening already.Doomed I tell ye! Doomed! Report Sportblog Facebook | Pick 0 1 Share via Email Share on Facebook Share Twitter Share on Facebook 24 Sep 2008 17:15 Twitter AndyRAC Share on Facebook 24 Sep 2008 10:22 Facebook Reply As someone who used to ‘eat, drink, sleep Football, it now largely leaves me cold. The main reason is money. When will fans wake up and smell the coffee? Theyre all a bunch of mugs being taken for a ride. How on earth can you justify £40 a ticket for game, especially a Carling Cup game? When is Football going to join the real world?It might sound harsh, but the sooner the bubble bursts the better, a reality check is needed. A train out of control.Also, this notion that Football started in 1992 and anything before doesnt count is grossly wrong and misleading. 24 Sep 2008 16:28 Reply “The biggest problem with the game is that no one actually sees there’s any problem at all”you said it Miro. This is the problem with most sports in the modern era: those running the show are too divorced from the fans to know there is a problem. Some clubs are finding gaps appearing in the stands. Man City are one of them, though this may change post-takeover. Boro & Blackburn are others. The problem is the average age of fans has climbed to 44. There are so few young fans at the match, cos of the high ticket prices. What will happen when the average age climbs into the 50s, and older fans begin to think “ah, I can watch it at home on telly in the warmth and comfort”?Incidentally, did you know clubs count ALL season ticket holders as having turned up, whether they have or not? So, very few clubs’ official attendance figures bear any relation to reality it seems a bit silly to take crowd numbers of one or two weekends as arguments for/against reactions to economic slumps. As if a football fan would say ‘oh Lehmann has gone bust, and the FTSE is down this week, so I won’t go to the match this saturday’.Of course you have to look at the long-term trend. I think it’s called “elasticity of demand” in economic theory. And if the dole per week is still 50 GBP, and a match ticket is 80GBP, your outlook seems optimistically stretched to me.miroljub, I admire your capability to come up with a LIST OF things/teams/problems/etc no matter what the subject is 🙂 (I mostly agree with your list of problems today though) Share on Facebook Share on Facebook ersatz1 unthreaded | Pick Share 24 Sep 2008 16:35 Reply Share on Facebook Facebook Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook 24 Sep 2008 10:37 Share on Facebook | Pick 0 1 Share miroljub Report extraordinaryrvanp Report Well let’s all crawl under a rock and have a good cry because there’s money in football! There has been for years and years and years. It’s not about to implode, the fans aren’t going to leave suddenly in droves and it will always be the countries biggest sport. Breathe… Share on Facebook newest Share Reply 3 Report Report Twitter Report Report Report Report miroljub Report | Pick comments (84)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. | Pick Reply Share on Twitter 24 Sep 2008 11:09 Share 50 I’m with Miro.Blimey, who’d’ve thought?Many of today’s football “supporters” (sic) demonstrate something more akin to brand loyalty than traditional support ; they are loud and brash with their support for their team, the best, one and only ‘don’t you dare criticize’ team. They’ll verbally chant down any gainsayers, like samurai heralding their warlord but in truth are a fairly shallow bunch. Watch what happens when the going gets tough, the glister fades and the popularity renders the whole shooting match somewhat less appealing. At the end of the day, it’s a product they consume.In music terms, they are the equivalent of the Kiss Army. They’ve heard the riffs but haven’t a clue who Robert Johnson was. And sooner of later they’ll want to change the record.I’m convinced that football sold its soul when the game stopped being primarily a game and increasingly became a business opportunity. There’s not the soul, not the connection that there was and frankly, Mr Shankley, I’m damn glad to have grown up when it was still the people’s game rather than the virtual reality behemoth that it’s become. Facebook 0 1 0 1 Share | Pick 2 0 1 The biggest problem with the game is that no one actually sees there’s any problem at all. The ‘best league in the world’ stereotypical phrase has become the aspirin-like universal answer to almost all problems. The second problem is that football doesn’t have the power to control its own destiny. The centres of real power are somewhere else, many of them invisible, and with a single aim to make the biggest possible profit at any cost, thus inevitably allowing greed, monopoly and corruption to go unchecked and later on to dominate. The third problem are the highest positioned football officials, and particularly the managers, like Alex Ferguson or Arsene Wenger. They have become too self-confident and prideful plus selfish to be concerned about the game future. They keep fighting each other, having no sense of perspective. The fourth problem is the utterly clueless media. Reply Share recommendations oldest Share on Facebook Twitter Reply 0 1 Reply I’ll correct myself instead – ‘these matches’ obviously. Fk knows who will proof-read what I’m writing now but after 14 hours in front of a laptop, it’s probably as bad as my last post. Everything begins to look Russian at this point.And Miss VP – did you reed it wrong or did I яight it wrong? And howyouknowIhe? Twitter Twitter Reply Reply Report Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter 0 1 Facebook 0 1 expanded Reply Share Reply Share on Twitter Share Facebook blogposts Twitter Since you’re here… 0 1 Share on Twitter Report 0 1 BrazilBranch Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other BrazilBranch DavidThe Premier League, as it is, is a recipe for total disaster:The ‘old-fashioned’ ingredients such as: enduring loyalty/profound commitment/feeling that you are not alone/sense of identification and membership/real love for the game/devotion/curiosity/addiction/trust…which all, despite being antithetical to our sinful human nature seeking to satisfy our own selfish whims, still exist among the PL followers, are destined to fade away and fail. Why? Because they are faced with too many fundamental challenges not to be ridiculed, so losing their meanings, with no adhesives to keep them together. The corporate greed and selfishness combined with the football people incompetence and blindness, will kill the game in England for good.The bigger the PL hype, the louder and more disturbing disaster will occur. Facebook | Pick 24 Sep 2008 16:13 1 Share on Messenger JJ139 Share on Twitter 4 Share Report donwendyagain | Pick 0 1 0 1 View more commentslast_img read more

For Your FCPA Listening Enjoyment

first_imgTired of reading about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?Well sometimes I get tired writing about the FCPA.Thus, today’s post is short on written content, but otherwise long on content as it contains links to several multi-media sources for your FCPA listening enjoyment.An FCPA Fireside Chat of SortsDavid Yosifon is a law professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. Professor Yosifon also runs The Corporate Social Responsibility Podcast and I had the pleasure to recently visit with him in this February 25th recording available on iTunes.During the approximate one hour conversation, we talk about the original goals of the FCPA, current approaches to enforcement, and areas of potential FCPA reform.A Focus on DPAsRecently, I had the pleasure to again visit with Thomas Fox for his Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Compliance and Ethics Report.In this episode, we discuss recent writings and rulings concerning the DOJ’s use of deferred prosecution agreements.Former FCPA Unit Chief Duross The Global Anticorruption Blog highlights a recent conference “Combating Grand Corruption: Is International Law the Answer” including comments by former FCPA Unit Chief Chuck Duross who speaks generally of his time at the DOJ.last_img read more

Corruption Of Government Officials Is The Top Fear Of Americans

first_imgThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act by design looks outward.Because of this, most of the chatter in the FCPA space is about foreign corruption and how foreign citizens feel about corruption in their own countries, and how that foreign corruption (however defined) serves as a destabilizing force resulting in broad-ranging effects in the foreign country.Many in the FCPA space latch on to foreign developments, no matter how loosely tied to corruption, such as a hunger strike in one foreign country, a march in another foreign country, or an act of civil disobedience in another foreign country.There is nothing wrong with this of course, but the anti-corruption community here in the United States should pause from time-to-time and look inward.Why?Because according to the recent Chapman University Survey of American Fears (a random sample of 1,541 adults from across the United States) the top fear of Americans is corruption of government officials.  This fear, expressed by 58% of poll respondents, exceeds the fear Americans have about, among other things, terrorism, identify theft, and economic issues.It is time for the anti-corruption community to wise up and look a bit more inward.A good place to start is by reviewing the over 55 posts tagged under this double standard heading.last_img read more

2016 FCPA Enforcement Begins With SEC Action Against SAP

first_imgWhen Vicente Garcia (a former head of Latin American sales for SAP) resolved a parallel DOJ / SEC FCPA enforcement action in August 2015 (see here for the prior post), the question remained: would there also be a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against SAP?Yesterday, the SEC answered that question in the affirmative by announcing an enforcement action against SAP (a German company with American Depository Shares registered with the SEC).The SAP action is the first FCPA enforcement action of 2016.Based on the same core conduct alleged in the prior Garcia action, SAP, without admitting or denying the SEC’s finding’s in an administrative order, agreed to pay approximately $3.9 million.In summary fashion, the order states:“This matter concerns violations of the books and records and internal controls provisions of the FCPA by SAP SE (“SAP”), a European Union corporation headquartered in Waldorf, Germany. The violations occurred due to deficient internal controls, which allowed SAP’s former Vice-President of Global and Strategic Accounts, Vicente E. Garcia, to discount the software price to a former SAP local partner at a level sufficient to permit Garcia and the local partner to pay $145,000 in bribes to one senior Panamanian government official, and offer bribes to two others. Through these bribes, Garcia secured government sales contracts of approximately $3.7 million for SAP, and also self-profited through kickbacks. By excessively discounting the SAP software, Garcia created a slush fund that the partner used to pay the bribes and kickbacks. Garcia concealed his scheme from others at SAP, circumvented SAP’s internal controls, and justified the excessive discounts by falsifying SAP’s internal approval forms.”“The deep discounts that Garcia used to create the slush fund were falsely recorded as legitimate discounts on the books of SAP’s Mexican subsidiary, which were subsequently consolidated into SAP’s financial statements. In addition, SAP failed to devise and maintain an adequate system of internal accounting controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurances that these improper payments to government officials did not occur.”According to the order:“Garcia, as a senior vice-president of SAP responsible for sales in Latin America, used his knowledge of the availability of discounts to push through large discounts in order to create a slush fund from which the local partner was able to pay the bribes. SAP routinely provides large discounts to local partners for legitimate reasons that Garcia used to justify the illegitimate discounts. Once Garcia obtained approval of the discounts based on his falsified justification forms, the bribes were then paid from the local partner.”[…]As a result of Garcia’s conduct in the bribery scheme, SAP, with its local partner, was able to sell software to the Panamanian government through four contracts from 2010 to 2013. These contracts generated revenues of approximately $3.7 million to SAP.The deep discounts that Garcia used to create the slush fund were falsely recorded as legitimate discounts on the books of SAP Mexico, which were subsequently consolidated into SAP’s financial statements.”Under the heading “SAP’s Insufficient Internal Controls,” the order states:“SAP lacked adequate internal controls to ensure that discounts to local partners were not improperly used. SAP’s system required employees to electronically submit requests within SAP to obtain approval of discounts to local partners. SAP employees, however, had wide latitude in seeking and approving discounts to local partners, and employees’ explanations for the discounts were accepted without verification. There were also no requirements for heightened anti-corruption scrutiny for large discounts. Garcia was therefore able to evade the basic approval procedures by taking advantage of his position and his knowledge of how discounts were approved. Furthermore, the nature of Garcia’s reporting structure made it easy for him to implement the bribery scheme. Although Garcia was located in Miami and employed by SAPI, he variously reported to supervisors employed by other regional subsidiaries and used employees from other subsidiaries such as SAP Mexico to execute the sales to the Panamanian government. This indirect reporting structure at SAP created gaps in supervising Garcia that provided him the opportunity to use the large discounts for creating a slush fund for bribes. Because of the deficient controls, Garcia was able to provide the partner with deep enough discounts to enable him to implement the bribery scheme, which continued unabated for over four years.”Based on the above findings, the order finds that SAP violated the FCPA’s books and records and internal controls provisions.Without admitting or denying the SEC’s findings, SAP agreed to pay disgorgement of $3.7 million “representing ill-gotten gains received in connection with the bribery scheme” and prejudgment interest of $188,896.Under the heading “SAP’s Cooperation and Remediation,” the order states:“When SAP learned of the conduct as a result of the SEC’s inquiry, SAP conducted a thorough internal investigation and extensively cooperated with the SEC’s investigation by, among other things: (i) conducting an internal investigation; (ii) voluntarily producing approximately 500,000 pages of documents and other information quickly, identifying significant documents and translating documents from Spanish; (iii) conducting witness interviews, sharing Power-Point presentations and timelines; (iv) facilitating an interview of Garcia at work at SAPI offices in Miami without alerting him to the investigation into his conduct; and (v) initiating a third party audit of the local partner.After being alerted to Garcia’s misconduct, SAP terminated Garcia and undertook remediation efforts to uncover any other possible misconduct and to improve its FCPA compliance. Specifically, SAP audited all recent public sector Latin American transactions, regardless of Garcia’s involvement, to analyze partner profit margin data especially in comparison to discounts so that any trends could be spotted and high profit margin transactions could be identified for further investigation and audit. SAP also implemented new policies and procedures to detect and prevent similar issues from recurring in the future. For example, SAP elevated the status of its Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”) by having that person now report directly to the CFO, who is a member of the Executive Board, and gave the CCO authority to independently terminate employees and partner contracts. SAP conducted, and continues to conduct, regular anti-corruption training, as well as anti-corruption audits through its internal audit function.In determining to accept the Offer, the Commission considered remedial acts undertaken by Respondent and cooperation afforded the Commission staff.”In this release, Kara Brockmeyer (Chief of the SEC’s FCPA Unit) stated: “SAP’s internal controls failed to flag Garcia’s misconduct as he easily falsified internal approval forms and disguised his bribes as discounts.”According to reports, SAP was represented by Patrick Robbins (Shearman & Sterling).last_img read more

Parasitic worms may prevent Crohns disease by altering bacterial balance

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The parasitic worms that lurk in some people’s intestines may be revolting, but they seem to forestall Crohn’s disease and other types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A new study might explain how, revealing that the worms enable beneficial microbes in the intestines to outcompete bacteria that promote inflammation. The results could lead to new ways of treating gut diseases by mimicking the effects of the parasites.“It’s a beautifully done paper,” says immunologist Joel Weinstock of Tufts University in Boston, who wasn’t connected to the work. “It had not been previously shown that one of the mechanisms [of IBD] is through changes in the intestinal flora.”In people with IBD, inflammation in the digestive tract results in symptoms such as diarrhea and bleeding and can sometimes lead to intestinal obstructions or other severe complications. Because parasitic worms, or helminths, can be harmful, they appear to be unlikely allies against these diseases. “They are called parasites for a reason,” says immunologist Ken Cadwell of the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, a co-author on the new study. However, IBD is rare in parts of the world where helminths are prevalent, and it is surging in more developed countries, where few people now carry the intestinal intruders. That difference suggests, researchers say, that they are protective. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email To determine how the worms could be our frenemies, Cadwell and colleagues tested mice with the same genetic defect found in many people with Crohn’s disease. Mucus-secreting cells in the intestines malfunction in the animals, reducing the amount of mucus that protects the gut lining from harmful bacteria. Researchers have also detected a change in the rodents’ microbiome, the natural microbial community in their guts. The abundance of one microbe, an inflammation-inducing bacterium in the Bacteroides group, soars in the mice with the genetic defect.The researchers found that feeding the rodents one type of intestinal worm restored their mucus-producing cells to normal. At the same time, levels of two inflammation indicators declined in the animals’ intestines. In addition, the bacterial lineup in the rodents’ guts shifted, the team reports online today in Science. Bacteroides’s numbers plunged, whereas the prevalence of species in a different microbial group, the Clostridiales, increased. A second species of worm also triggers similar changes in the mice’s intestines, the team confirmed.To check whether helminths cause the same effects in people, the scientists compared two populations in Malaysia: urbanites living in Kuala Lumpur, who harbor few intestinal parasites, and members of an indigenous group, the Orang Asli, who live in a rural area where the worms are rife. A type of Bacteroides, the proinflammatory microbes, predominated in the residents of Kuala Lumpur. It was rarer among the Orang Asli, where a member of the Clostridiales group was plentiful. Treating the Orang Asli with drugs to kill their intestinal worms reversed this pattern, favoring Bacteroides species over Clostridiales species, the team documented.Cadwell and colleagues also asked whether Clostridiales and Bacteroides microbes were at odds in other people. They analyzed two sets of data on the frequencies of different intestinal microbes, which include results for healthy U.S. residents and kids in North America who have IBD. They saw the same relationship—when Clostridiales species are up, Bacteroides varieties are down, and vice versa.The study’s findings suggest that parasitic worms deliver their benefits indirectly through their impact on the microbial mixture in the intestines. Worms are “having an anti-inflammatory effect by kicking out something that is inflammatory,” Cadwell says. Members of the Clostridiales group may get a boost when worms are around, he says, because the intestines produce more mucus, which the bacteria feast on.“This is a good proof of concept,” says immunologist Gabriel Nunez of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, who wasn’t connected to the research. It supports “the principle that some of these diseases may be related to changes in the microbiome.” But he cautions that researchers still need direct evidence that Bacteroides species are responsible for Crohn’s disease.Turning the results into a treatment for IBD could be difficult. Two recent clinical trials of helminth treatment for Crohn’s disease, in which participants drank a solution containing the worms’ eggs, stopped early because the results were disappointing. These studies may not be the last word, however. Cadwell says that worm therapy might work in the roughly 30% of Crohn’s patients who have the same genetic flaw as the mice. And Weinstock notes that if researchers can determine how the parasites trigger the shift in microbe composition, “we may be able to bypass the worms and develop a small molecule drug to get the effect in a safe way.”last_img read more

Blue ribbon report urges US cancer moonshot to invest in 10 promising

first_imgOne thrust is a better understanding of tumors—how their cellular and genetic makeup shapes a patient’s response to drugs and how tumors evolve to develop resistance. Some researchers are already compiling this kind of information in various databases. The panel recommends creating a “data ecosystem” that would link them together. “We want something where NCI may be acting in the role of coordinating all of these databases so we can benefit from huge amount of data available but now are fragmented,” says report co-chair Dinah Singer, NCI acting deputy director in Bethesda, Maryland. Another recommendation is a new patient network that would allow cancer patients to submit their tumors for genomic testing and share the results and their clinical outcomes with researchers. Participants would also be able to “preregister” themselves in a database to indicate that they’re interested in enrolling in clinical trials. Right now, patients in trials tend to be those being treated at major cancer centers, and only 5% of all patients are enrolled in trials.To make tumor profiling available to all, however, the federal Medicare program will need to revise its policies to allow reimbursement for this testing, Singer says. The blue ribbon panel passes this and several other policy issues on to Biden’s federal moonshot task force.The panel also wants to build a completely new human tumor database that would probe not only mutations that trigger cancer in a person, but the 3D complex of immune and other cells surrounding a tumor that help sustain its growth and allow it to spread. It would be like an older NCI-funded database, the Tumor Cancer Genome Atlas, but “on steroids,” Jacks says. And the moonshot should consider funding a clinical trials network that would test in adult and pediatric cancer patients novel immunotherapies, which harness the immune system to fight tumors, the report says. For this, NCI expects to collaborate with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy led by Jeffrey Bluestone of the University of California, San Francisco, who was a member of the blue ribbon panel, Singer says. That is one of many public-private partnerships that the panel envisions. “We see NCI playing a critical role in coordinating these activities but there’s no way NCI could undertake the funding of all this,” Singer says.As part of new prevention efforts, another project would test colon cancer patients for mutations in DNA repair genes, which underlie about 3% of colon cancer cases as well as some endometrial cancers. If a patient carries these mutations, family members could then be tested to learn whether they’re at high risk for these cancers. As many as a million Americans carry these mutations, but most don’t know it, Singer says. Jacks, Singer, and co-chair Elizabeth Jaffee, a cancer researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, discuss the report in a Policy Forum published today in Science.One looming question discussed by NCAB today is whether Congress will fund the moonshot. President Obama requested $755 million for the moonshot in the 2017 fiscal year that begins 1 October, including $680 million for the National Institutes of Health. But lawmakers have so far not included that money in draft spending bills. Another option is that the moonshot funding would become part of other bills that aim to accelerate medical innovation, but their prospects too are uncertain.Jacks urged NCAB members to “implore” Congress to fund the moonshot. And AACR’s Retzlaff says his group now thinks lawmakers will be ready to move forward with some type of moonshot funding, whether through a standalone bill or by adding the funding to the spending bills.Singer said that even without new funding, NCI could begin funding some projects in the report on a small scale. And Greg Simon, executive director of the moonshot federal task force and CEO of health care investing company Poliwogg in Washington, D.C., assured NCAB members today that the report will remain relevant into the next presidential administration. “These ideas are going to survive,” he said. *Update, 7 September, 1:12 p.m.: This story has been updated with comments from report co-chairs and NCAB discussion.For more coverage on this topic, visit our Cancer topic page. Project Description ProjectHuman tumor atlas DescriptionCatalog genetic lesions and immune cell and other interactions in the tumor microenvironment for cancers of all types. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Source: NCI ProjectPatient network DescriptionCompile patients’ tumor profiling data and preregister them for clinical trials. Email The panel’s 10 recommendations, from studies of tumor biology to research on patient care (see table, below), don’t contain any big surprises. That’s because the panel was asked to look for existing research areas that were ready to be accelerated and could “produce results in the near term,” says co-chair and cancer biologist Tyler Jacks of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “However, the way these efforts are organized, resourced, and coordinated is new.” ProjectEvidence-based prevention DescriptionStudy ways to speed adoption of proven strategies, including screening, to reduce cancer risk. ProjectBiopsy analysis DescriptionAnalyze biopsies from thousands of patients given standard treatments to learn which tumor features predict outcome. ProjectDrug resistance research DescriptionUncover mechanisms that allow cancer cells to evade previously effective treatments.center_img ProjectImmunotherapy clinical trials network DescriptionTest novel immune-based treatments for adult and pediatric cancers. ProjectFusion oncoproteins in pediatric cancer DescriptionStudy abnormal proteins resulting from chromosomal translocations that drive many childhood cancers. Ten targets for the cancer moonshotBlue ribbon panel’s recommendations for Vice President Joe Biden’s cancer-fighting plan range from tumor databases to immunotherapy trials. ProjectCancer data ecosystem DescriptionLink and share large data sets to facilitate discoveries that will improve patient outcomes. Vice President Joe Biden’s proposed moonshot to conquer cancer should invest in large collaborations, data sharing projects, and the promising cancer treatment known as immunotherapy, among 10 areas described in an advisory group’s draft report released this morning. The report was accepted (with one abstention) today by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) advisory board, which is expected to pass it on to the NCI director and then to a federal task force. Now, Congress just needs to come up with the money to pay for the moonshot, research advocates say.“We are hopeful that these recommendations are going to be so exciting that Congress will be looking to identify paths forward to fund the cancer moonshot initiative,” says Jon Retzlaff, managing director of science policy and government affairs for the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Washington, D.C., one of several cancer research and patient organizations that are praising the report.Biden first proposed a moonshot to cure cancer last year after his son Beau died of brain cancer. President Barack Obama embraced the idea in his January State of the Union address, with Biden vowing to make a decade’s worth of advances in 5 years. To help guide the effort, a 28-member blue ribbon panel of NCI’s National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB) then consulted with more than 150 experts and reviewed more than 1600 suggestions from researchers and the public. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe ProjectTechnology DescriptionDevelop promising new tools that will speed testing of therapies and characterization of tumors. ProjectSymptom management research DescriptionSupport guidelines for routine monitoring and management of patient symptoms. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Video Shows Cops Threatening To Kill Black Family

first_imgAnother police officer approached the vehicle and pointed his gun at everybody inside, including Ames’ fiancee and two young children.All because a doll was allegedly stolen from a Family Dollar store.In the end, police left without arresting or charging anybody for anything.The ugly episode was recorded by at least two bystanders, with friends of one of the people filming being compelled to go get Ames’ children to keep them from watching police treat him and his fiancee like animals.Police were apparently concealing the name of the officer who kept screaming menacing curses at the family and threatening to shoot them. The family was suing for $10 million in damages for “battery, unlawful imprisonment, false arrest, infliction of emotional distress, and violation of civil rights under the fifth and 14th amendments of the United States Constitution,” according to the notice that Ames intends to file a lawsuit. He and his family were being represented by Former Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne.SEE ALSO: 20 Tweets Dragging Roseanne Barr To A White Privilege Hell “My hands are up! My hands are up!” 22yo Dravon Ames says as a Phoenix police officer yells to “get your fucking hands up.” The same officer later says “You’re gonna fucking get shot!”Ames says the officers stopped him after his child walked out of a Dollar Store with a doll. pic.twitter.com/Nlkd7IXsyc— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019“Ames told New Times he had just pulled into the parking lot of an apartment complex to drop off his kids with a babysitter when Phoenix police officers surrounded the car and told them to get out,” the local news outlet wrote. “Ames alleges that Phoenix police approached him because, unbeknownst to him, his daughter had walked out of the nearby Family Dollar holding a doll from the store. Someone at the store told an officer on security detail that his daughter had stolen from the store, he said.”When police got Ames out of his car, an officer appeared to slam his head against a squad car while violently kicking his legs open to frisk and handcuff him.“If I tell you to do something you fucking do it!” the cop roared at Ames, who compliantly responded by saying, “Yes, sir.” Another angle of the incident filmed by a different resident of the apartment complex where Ames and his pregnant fiancee were dropping off their kids with a babysitter show a Phoenix police officer trying to yank the child from the mother’s arms. pic.twitter.com/pTb07lZAXD— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019 The video shows Ames and his family complying with police, with one officer yelling expletives hysterically while threatening to shoot them all.“You’re gonna fucking get shot!” the cop yells at one point.“I’m gonna put a fucking cap in your fucking head,” he said in another instance.center_img Also On News One: Phoenix Police Department The Arizona family shown in a viral video having their lives threatened by police over a doll that was allegedly stolen from a store plans to sue the department for what they said was a number of civil rights violations, the Phoenix New Times reported. Dravon Ames was with his pregnant fiancée and their two small children when they were approached by numerous aggressive police officers in an apartment complex parking lot in Phoenix. last_img read more

Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions

first_imgOver the past few years, with the launch of the European Space Agency’s satellites Sentinel 1A and Sentinel 1B, the field of volcanology has received frequent, repeated views of how the ground shifts around the world’s volcanoes. The Sentinel 1 satellites use a technique called radar interferometry, which compares radar signals sent to and reflected from Earth to track changes in the planet’s surface. The method isn’t new, but, uniquely, the Sentinel 1 satellites revisit each spot on the planet once every 6 days, and the Sentinel team releases those high-resolution observations rapidly. A research group in the United Kingdom called the Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics (COMET) had already begun to create a database of these ground-movement snapshots, called interferograms, for the world’s volcanoes. Overlaying this database with automated detection seemed natural given the success machine learning has had in other forms of pattern detection, says Hooper, who works with COMET.Changes in ground motion typically reflect magma shifting beneath the volcano and do not perfectly predict eruptions. But unlike thermal hot spots or ash plumes, which can be automatically detected with weather satellites, land shifts can help predict eruptions, not simply indicate their occurrence. “Deformation doesn’t always mean eruption,” Hooper says. “But there are few cases where we don’t have an eruption without deformation.”First, the teams had to teach their algorithms not to confuse atmospheric shifts for ground motion, something interferograms are prone to do. To do that, Hooper’s team settled on a technique called independent component analysis, which learns to break apart a signal into different pieces: such as stratified atmosphere or short-term turbulence, along with ground shifts in a volcano’s caldera or flank. The technique allows them to catch both brand-new ground motions, or changes in rate, both of which can be signs of pending eruption.Meanwhile, another COMET team led by Juliet Biggs, a volcanologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, has built a second algorithm using a increasingly popular form of artificial intelligence called convolutional neural networks, which use layers of biologically inspired “neurons” to break apart features of images into ever-more-abstract pools, learning how to tell, for example, cats from dogs. The researchers first trained their neural network using raw interferograms from Envisat, Sentinel’s precursor, for which they had existing examples of eruptions. Although the algorithm had some success on an analysis of 30,000 Sentinel interferograms, it still produced too many false positives. There were simply too few examples to learn from, says Fabien Albino, a volcanologist who works with Biggs at Bristol. “For machine learning, 100 is nothing. They want thousands and thousands.”To overcome that problem, Biggs and her colleagues create a synthetic data set of computer-simulated eruptions, generated for a few known physical patterns. These synthetic data dropped the fraction of false positives from some 60% to 20%, as they reported today at the AGU meeting. That trend will only continue to get better as more Sentinel examples are poured into the algorithm, Albino says. “The system is just going to tune like Google, [inputting] millions of cats and dogs, and afterward the system knows. It doesn’t have to learn anymore. It’s stable.”Although some continued technical hiccups on COMET’s volcano database have prevented the teams from running their algorithms close to real time on all volcanoes, Hooper has run their technique on select spots, including the volcanic peaks known as Sierra Negra and Wolf on the Galápagos Islands. Both erupted this past year, and Hooper’s program caught both as their unrest started, he reported yesterday at the meeting.The two algorithms are complementary; the neural network, for example, cannot catch very slow changes in deformation, but the independent component analysis can. So it’s likely that COMET’s warning system will use both, Hooper says. For now, the challenge is speeding up how quickly COMET can pull the radar data from Sentinel into its database. Although these data are available from Sentinel within a few hours, it still takes several weeks for them to fully transfer. It’s painstaking work, Hooper says. “We thought we’d be further along.”Still, the work looks exactly what the world needs, Poland says. “It’s an impressive first step,” he says. “It could absolutely revolutionize detecting these events.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe New algorithms processing satellite data automatically caught the ground motion before the eruption of Wolf Volcano in the Galápagos Islands. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Lucas Bustamante/Minden Pictures By Paul VoosenDec. 11, 2018 , 4:00 PMcenter_img Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions Satellites are providing torrents of data about the world’s active volcanoes, but researchers have struggled to turn them into a global prediction of volcanic risks. That may soon change with newly developed algorithms that can automatically tease from that data signals of volcanic risk, raising the prospect that within a couple years scientists could develop a global volcano warning system.Without such tools, geoscientists simply can’t keep up with information pouring out the satellites, says Michael Poland, the scientist-in-charge of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Yellowstone Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington, who was not involved in either study. “The volume of data is overwhelming,” he says.Andrew Hooper, a volcanologist at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom who led the development of one method, says the new algorithms should benefit the roughly 800 million people who live near volcanoes. “About 1400 volcanoes have potential to erupt above the sea,” he says. “About 100 are monitored. The vast majority aren’t.” Both methods were presented this week in Washington, D.C., at the semiannual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

Cardiac arrest kills most victims outside the hospital Could an artificial heartlung

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Cardiac arrest kills most victims outside the hospital. Could an artificial heart-lung machine help? By Jennifer Couzin-FrankelFeb. 28, 2019 , 12:20 PM Real-life medical theater doesn’t get much more dramatic: A 66-year-old tourist collapsed in the Louvre in Paris, in front of a painting by Eugène Delacroix. Firefighters stationed at the museum administered CPR. Then, a French “mobile intensive care unit”—delayed by rush hour traffic and arriving 19 minutes later—swooped in. Surrounded by majestic artwork, the medical team hooked up the patient to a high-tech life support system: Liters of his blood were routed outside his body, infused with oxygen, and pumped back in.The man, treated several years ago, died within 24 hours of arriving at a hospital. But the strategy to try to save him, called extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), is sparking excitement in medical circles—and some anxiety. The machinery for ECPR is already widely used to support patients in heart surgery and sometimes to rescue those who suffer cardiac arrest in the hospital. It also treats infants and children teetering near death from heart or lung failure. (In pediatrics, it’s known as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or ECMO.)Now, efforts are spreading to apply ECPR to adults who, like the tourist in Paris, suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital. Although Paris has deployed ECPR in museums and on subway platforms, most cities limit it to emergency rooms or catheterization labs. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img A team in the University of Utah Health eCPR Program puts a patient on the life support machinery. A consortium at the university is gathering data on how people who have cardiac arrests outside of the hospital fare after being hooked up to it. Scott Youngquist & Joseph Tonna Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) “We all really want it to work,” says Clifton Callaway, an emergency medicine physician at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. But he and others are awaiting a verdict from clinical trials now underway. One worry is that people rescued by ECPR may have a poor quality of life afterward, for example, because of cognitive impairment. Another question is whether the technology, which requires extensive training, an overhaul of paramedic practices, and tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars per patient to implement, is worth whatever benefit it confers.Still, doctors crave a better treatment for cardiac arrest, which can result from blocked arteries, drug overdoses, hypothermia, and other causes. Only about 10% of the 350,000 or so adults in the United States whose hearts stop outside a hospital each year survive. The chest compressions of CPR offer, “at best, 25% of normal” blood flow, says Steven Brooks, an emergency medicine physician at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. With ECPR that soars to 100%.Japan was the first to publish case studies of ECPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, beginning in the 1980s. In 2015, an Australian team wrote in Resuscitation that 14 of 24 patients survived without neurological problems after having a cardiac arrest inside or outside of the hospital and receiving treatment with ECPR and other interventions. The University of Minnesota (UM) in Minneapolis has treated more patients with ECPR than anywhere else in the United States, more than 200 in the past 3 years. The team published late last year in Resuscitation that of 100 people, 40 survived and fared well. Some had minimal deficits, such as mild short-term memory loss, but were expected to improve with time, UM cardiologist and critical care physician Jason Bartos says. “You have the sickest patients … [and] an opportunity to provide a big benefit,” he adds.Just how big that opportunity is remains an open question. Doctors like Bartos and Callaway—whose hospital uses ECPR on about five people brought in with cardiac arrest each year—know that medicine is littered with tales of phenomenal treatments that falter during randomized trials. One worry about the observational research, such as the reports from Japan and Minnesota, is that the patients receiving ECPR may have already had a better chance of survival than most, skewing the results.With that in mind, investigators have launched randomized trials to compare ECPR to standard CPR. The largest, in the Czech Republic, is slated to report results next year. “If you don’t do a trial early on, then it will be implemented very widely, and it’s very difficult to step back and re-evaluate whether it actually is useful,” says Marcel van de Poll, a critical care physician at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His is one of six Dutch hospitals that enrolled the first of a planned 110 people in May 2017. Like many trials in emergency medicine, it doesn’t obtain consent at the time of enrollment because the patient is unconscious and time is too precious to seek consent from family members. A third trial, in Minneapolis, expects to launch this summer.The ethics of ECPR weigh heavily and are one reason doctors consider trials so important. ECPR is a desperate measure and an invasive one, including what one doctor describes as “garden hose–size catheters” inserted into the groin. “We have no idea whether these patients would like to be under such a type of care,” says Jan Bělohlávek, a cardiologist at Charles University in Prague who is leading the Czech trial. He enrolled the first patient in 2013 and the 185th last week. The majority of those on ECPR still die, Bělohlávek points out, and it is “a very bad dying”: Unlike a cardiac arrest followed by sudden death, with ECPR, patients can endure slow-motion organ failure, coupled with anguish among loved ones watching the decline.Whereas guidelines govern when to stop CPR, with ECPR, “all of a sudden you’re supporting heart and lung function, you can support [that] indefinitely, which may create conundrums,” says Brian Grunau, an emergency medicine physician at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. In January, he and his colleagues described in Circulation treating a young person with ECPR who sustained severe brain damage, whose family initially resisted removing life support.One of the biggest fears has been that ECPR might rescue patients only to leave them in dismal shape. Centers performing ECPR say this happens only rarely. But it does happen. In Minneapolis, six patients of 100 were left with severe brain damage; all died of infections within a few months. In Prague, four patients who initially survived died within 6 months of heart failure, sepsis, or pneumonia.Whether to implement ECPR across whole cities and regions won’t be an easy decision, many believe. Even if it works well, it may be best for a small subset of cardiac arrest patients: people who are relatively young, have few other health issues, and experienced a fixable problem that caused their heart to stop, such as a blocked artery. And yet, “That’s why it’s so enticing,” Brooks says. “The people who it could help are those who are in the prime of their life.”last_img read more