Social media ‘integral’ to SA students’ lives

first_img12 November 2013 South Africa’s students are addicted to social media – but are almost unanimous that it enhances their academic and social lives, and even helps them during exam time, according to a recent study from researchers World Wide Worx and Student Brands. The SA High-tech Student 2013 research study, which was released last month, was conducted at universities and colleges across South Africa, and included interviews with 1 435 students. Well over half – 59% – said they were addicted to social media. However, only 16% fell into the “highly addicted” category, while 18% said they were “definitely not addicted”. Instant messaging (IM) had similar appeal to students: 62% said they were addicted, of which 22% said they were highly addicted to the quick fix of quick chat. However, respondents felt that this addiction was not necessarily a bad thing. While 45% of respondents said social networking and technology got in the way of their studies, only 10% said it was a constant problem. A surprising 85% said it improved their studies, with a similar proportion – 83% – believing it enhanced their social lives. Asked what impact technology like smartphones and the internet had on their lives in general, 81% said it enhanced their quality of life. “For students, social networking and the internet is not a good or a bad thing in itself, but has become an integral part of their lives,” Daryl Bartkunsky, managing director of Student Brands, said in a statement.Facebook first, then Twitter Facebook was the universal social destination for students, with 96% of respondents using it, with Twitter used by 70% of respondents. Google+ slotted into third place, at 47%, thanks to the pervasive use of Google Apps for student accounts at universities. Mxit still retained a strong user base, with 39% of respondents reporting they used it. LinkedIn, the professional network, claimed a 29% share, largely students who are nearing completion of their studies and using it for employment prospects. Instagram and Pinterest, relative newcomers to the social networking environment, attracted 16% and 15% of respondents respectively. When asked which network they would use if they could only choose one, two-thirds (64%) still cited Facebook. Twitter was in distant second at 16%, followed by Google+ with 7%, Instagram 5%, Mxit 3% and LinkedIn 3%. Only 1% favoured Pinterest.Instant messaging Among instant messaging (IM) apps, similar levels of dominance were seen, this time led by WhatsApp, which was used by 79% of students participating in the survey, and BBM, at 57%. Facebook Messenger claimed 45%, and Mxit 28%. BBM use was directly correlated with the proportion of students who used BlackBerry: 57%. Despite its fading popularity worldwide, it remained the preferred phone among students. Nokia was in a distant second place, at only 20%, with Samsung further back in third place, at 14%, and the iPhone fourth at 5%. Among other findings, the survey found that 68% of students connected to the internet via smartphones, 61% via laptops or notebook computers, 50% on desktop PCs – largely using universities’ and colleges’ machines – and 20% on tablets. This trend was driven by some institutions providing laptops and tablets to students, and low-cost financing of devices by student financial services like Eduloan.Campus wi-fi set to rule In terms of channel of access, 60% used wi-fi on campus, 40% used 3G modems, and 39% used mobile data on their phones. However, a total shift to wi-fi is expected in the next two years. “By 2015, all universities are required to be wireless, providing free internet access for students,” Bartkunsky said. “Already, the University of Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town have stated that all first-year students will have to have a tablet or laptop by 2015.” World Wide Worx MD Arthur Goldstuck pointed out that the cost of mobile data was a major inhibitor for students. “A little more than a third of respondents were happy with what they pay for internet access,” Goldstuck said. ‘But 31% are unhappy with the cost and 30% don’t pay at all. For students, the move away from mobile data services is a matter of when, not if.” World Wide Worx and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

iPhone OS International Growth on the Rise, Still Dominates Mobile Web Traffic

first_imgRole of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement As of June 2009, AdMob reports that 54% of iPhone OS users were in the U.S. However, this number has dropped from 61% in January of this year, implying that international growth is now outpacing U.S. user growth. Following the U.S., the other top iPhone/iPod Touch-owning countries include the U.K., Germany, and France, each having over 5% of users. Not surprisingly, there are far more iPhones in use than iPod Touches. The worldwide ration of iPhone to iPod Touch is nearly 2 to 1, says AdMod. This ratio has remained consistent over the last several months. iPhone OS Percentage of Smartphone TrafficAnother interesting metric from the recent report is the amount of traffic generated by Apple mobile devices. The iPhone OS literally dominates the charts when compared to the other smartphones worldwide – in fact, it’s responsible for nearly half (47%) of smartphone requests. Nokia’s Symbian OS is still in a respectable second place with 34% of requests, but then the numbers dip down quite a bit. Blackberry’s RIM OS only accounts for 7% of requests, for example, and Android only has 5%. However, AdMob notes that requests from the Android operating system have increased 25% month over month and have, for the first time, pulled ahead of Windows Mobile, which dropped to 4%. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology The 45 million iPhones and iPod Touches sold over the last two years is having a major impact on the worldwide mobile phone ecosystem. Today, nearly half of smartphone web traffic comes from an Apple device. Although the iPhone is still a popular device in the U.S., the number of international users is now growing at a faster rate than here, at least according to the latest Mobile Metrics Report (PDF) from mobile ad firm AdMob.iPhone OS Geographic DistributionIn the June 2009 Mobile Metrics Report, the focus was on the geographic distribution of the iPhone OS – the operating system that powers Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch. North America is still the largest region with a 58% share. Western Europe is in second at 26%. From there, the percentages drop dramatically, as the chart below illustrates. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … sarah perezcenter_img Tags:#Apple#mobile#Trends#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What we can learn from this recent round of data is that the iPhone OS could easily be on its way to becoming a worldwide phenomenon. Although the U.S. still retains the number one spot when it comes to the country having the most iPhones and iPod Touches, the rate of adoption here has slowed. As worldwide growth speeds up, the chart may end up being less lopsided than it is now as other regions gain more users. Still, you can’t count out Apple’s competitors just yet. Android’s rapid growth is something to keep an eye on, especially as more models of Android phones are introduced. The Palm Pre – only responsible for 2% of smartphone requests – is also too new to the market for anyone to form any definitive conclusions about just yet (although the fact that it registered at all on a chart that features only the major smartphone players is worth noting). All that being said, it’s clear that the iPhone OS has a commanding lead when it comes to surfing the mobile web, and that’s something that won’t change overnight…if it ever changes at all. Related Posts last_img read more

On Upselling

first_imgYou must upsell your clients.Upselling your clients isn’t about producing more revenue for you and your company, although it will certainly produce that outcome.Upselling your clients isn’t about improving your profit margins, even though it will absolutely make you and your company more profitable.Upselling isn’t about moving your clients upstream into a high priced solution as part of your sales strategy, even though it’s sometimes the right strategy and it often works.It isn’t about your commission check.Upselling is about creating the maximum amount of value for your clients.Let’s say you walk into your dream client’s office for a meeting. They know what they need and share those needs with you. You have just the solution. It’s what they need and will get them the right outcome. All you have to do is help them buy it. It’s an easy sale. But that doesn’t make it the right sale.What if there is something more your client needs? What if there is a larger, more strategic outcome you could deliver? Selling your client what they need isn’t the same as creating the maximum value that you can create. Stopping short of maximum value creation makes you transactional.So why don’t you upsell your clients? First, it’s easier just take the deal in front of you. Some salespeople just take the easy sale and move on. But the second reason some salespeople don’t upsell their dream clients is because they’re afraid that by increasing the size and scope of the deal they lower their chances of winning it. They also believe that increasing the value created also means lengthening the sales cycle (and it might).Not upselling means not creating the maximum value for your client. It means choosing to be transactional instead of strategic. Not upselling also means increasing the likelihood that one of your competitors (one who isn’t afraid of losing and isn’t afraid of a little longer sales cycle) will win their business—and their mindshare, their wallet share, and their loyalty.Your job is to create the maximum value for your client in every deal. That doesn’t mean selling them more than they need (that’s about you). But it also doesn’t mean selling them less than they need (that’s about you, too). Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more