John Land Apopka Community Trust – Open for Business

first_img Reply Previous articleApopka Police and Firefighters Win Orlando Magic Basketball TournamentNext articleGlo Smith to Speak at NORWF in April Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The John Land Apopka Community Trust was founded to serve greater ApopkaThe John Land Apopka Community Trust has been around for more than 3 years, but its existence and purpose have been shrouded in mystery and rumor.  While the Trust is one of the most talked about organizations in Apopka, little is actually known about it.When was it formed?  Why was it formed?  What has it accomplished?  Who is in charge?  What is the connection with the City of Apopka?The Apopka Voice recently met with the Secretary of the Trust, David Rankin, in an attempt to learn the answers to these questions and more.The Trust is not a “trust.”  It is a not for profit corporation and was formed on February 8, 2013.  The original name was “Apopka Community Trust, Inc.”According to Rankin, the Trust was conceived by Mayor John Land in response to numerous requests for the City to fund various activities.  While worthwhile, it was sometimes hard to justify spending City funds. Mayor Land saw that other communities had established community trusts that were being used for these purposes.Two examples are the Mount Dora Community Trust and the Leesburg Partnership.During its first year of operation the Trust collected about $50,000 in donations while the Board of the Trust looked for worthwhile activities to support.In April 2014 the Trust received a huge boost when the Apopka City Council, by unanimous vote, agreed to donate $200,000 in honor of Mayor Land’s service to Apopka.  The Board decided to change its name and effective May 15, 2015 became known as the “John Land Apopka Community Trust, Inc.”The first significant project it funded was the $47,000 purchase of rings and jackets for the 2014 Apopka High School State Championship Football Team in April 2015.In August 2015 it contributed $1,500 to the Apopka Little League and another $1,500 to the Orange County 4H Association.  The 4H funds were used to help send five Apopka High School students to national livestock competitions in Kentucky and Pennsylvania.In September 2015 the Trust agreed to contribute up to $20,000 to the City of Apopka to help with the design and construction of two statues of Mayor John Land.In December of 2015 it donated $2,000 to help fund a banquet for the Apopka High School Bowling Team to celebrate their third-in-a-row State Championship.“The John Land Apopka Community Trust is open for business,” said David Rankin. “We are accepting and reviewing funding applications.  We are soliciting donations so that we can fulfill our mission.”According to Rankin, anyone wanting to apply for funding can do so on the Trust’s website.To date, the Trust’s primary fundraising has been on a project-by-project basis.  Funds were raised from more than 25  individuals and organizations for the football team rings and jackets.  Currently it is “selling” bricks to provide funding for the statues of Mayor Land.  More on that project here.The Trust is  Public Charity and is subject to Section 501(c)3 of the IRS code.  While it works closely with The City of Apopka and other governmental entities it operates independently of those entities, and is governed by a Board of Directors. Mama Mia Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 These type of “trusts” or “not for profits” are very useful. A nearby example is the Leesburg Partnership. That organization is what runs the Leesburg Bikefest each year, not the City of Leesburg. All of the monies derived from beer sales, vendor location rentals and so on are run through the partnership. The John Land Trust has been very useful for the functions that Mr Rankin has listed in the responses here. The Anatomy of Fear Michael Heaton Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter April 4, 2016 at 10:28 pm Please enter your comment! April 6, 2016 at 8:05 pm Reply center_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate After visiting the websites of both Mount Dora and Leesburg’s community trusts, I am disappointed in the lack of information on the Apopka website. I have a difficult time donating to an organization with as little transparency as the John Land Community Trust. Please enter your name here Chris Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 3 COMMENTS I would be in favor of having Bret Michaels in concert in Apopka! The thought gets me excited! JLT can fund it, ha ha! I would not complain, at all! Could sell some sizable tickets to put money back into the pot. Leesburg Bikefest has him scheduled to appear on April 23. If they can get him, so can we. XOXO’s !!!!!! April 5, 2016 at 11:25 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Government approvals received for $575m sale of Uganda assets to Total

first_imgTullow will provide a further update once the transaction has closed and funds have been received Government approvals received for sale of Uganda assets to Total. (Credit: skeeze from Pixabay) Tullow Oil plc (Tullow) is pleased to announce that the Government of Uganda and the Ugandan Revenue Authority have executed a binding Tax Agreement that reflects the pre-agreed principles on the tax treatment of the sale of Tullow’s Ugandan assets to Total. The Ugandan Minister of Energy and Mineral Development has also approved the transfer of Tullow’s interests to Total and the transfer of operatorship for Block 2.With all the Government-related conditions to closing having been satisfied, Tullow expects the transaction to close in the coming days after completing certain customary pre-closing steps with Total. Tullow will provide a further update once the transaction has closed and funds have been received. On closing, Tullow will receive $500 million consideration and a further $75 million when a Final Investment Decision is taken on the development project. In addition, Tullow is entitled to receive contingent payments linked to the oil price payable after production commences. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

Gâteau Opéra

first_imgIngredients for coffee syrupSugar syrup (½ sugar, ½ water): 500mlInstant coffee (dissolved in a little boiling water): 5 tablespoonsBrandy to taste T his is a classic, multi-layered, coffee and chocolate flavoured cake or slice, which appeared in Paris in the 1930s. It was created in honour of the Paris Opera House.It has a very good shelf-life, as it is made in a slab and can be cut to any size as required and, if constructed correctly, looks absolutely stunning.The key is to ensure that each layer is completely flat throughout.We charge £1.80 per portion. Method1 Place a sponge sheet on a sheet of silicon.2 Brush generously with coffee syrup – we flavour ours with brandy.3 Spread out a flat, even layer of buttercream, approximately 3mm thick (see hint). Place the second layer of sponge carefully over the buttercream and soak with coffee syrup.4 Spread an even 3mm layer of ganache over the second layer of sponge. Place on the third layer of sponge. Again, soak with coffee syrup and cover with buttercream (as steps 1-3).5 Place on the fourth layer of sponge and soak. Spread on a last 3mm layer of ganache: the surface should be very flat at this stage. Refrigerate to set. The cross section should now have nice parallel and even layers.6 Carefully trim the edges so that they are true.7 Lastly, spread a thin layer of shiny chocolate glaze over the surface.center_img Basic ingredients4 flat sponge sheets (joconde), approximately 4mm thick, coffee syrup (see recipe), coffee butter cream, ganache, chocolate glazelast_img read more

Grenada wins Windward Islands Twenty20 Championship

first_imgNewsSports Grenada wins Windward Islands Twenty20 Championship by: – May 30, 2011 by Michael BascombeWin Lott t 20/20 Champions, Greanda at Windsor Park Stadium in Roseau last night. ST GEORGE’S, Grenada — Grenada won the Windward Islands Twenty20 Championship in Dominica on Sunday, defeating the hosts by 77 runs at the Windsor Stadium, after winning the toss and setting a challenging total of 156 for 5 off 20 overs.Devon Smith was run out for 79 on the final ball of the innings but after sharing an important fifth wicket partnership of 103 runs with Tade Carmichael, who made 44 off 36 balls. Captain Andre Fletcher made 16.In reply, Dominica found a resilient Grenada and only survived 14.5 overs in totaling 79 with John Olive and Nelon Pascal each taking three wickets and two wickets apiece for Eamon Alexander and Ronald Ettienne.Grenada’s Sports Minister Patrick Simmons said that the performance of the national team again demonstrates the important role sports continue to play in the daily life of our people.“Sports continue to be a unifying force and our sportsmen are playing their role whether it’s in athletics, football, cricket or any other sport,” he said.“They showed that they were compact in all areas of the game and this performance is a good sign that our cricketers continue to improve”.Also extending congratulations to the national cricket team is one of Grenada’s ace runners, Kirani James. In a brief message, James, who is ardent cricket fan, said “congrats to the team”.Smith was named Most Valuable Player of the Championship. Among the other individual awards for Grenada, Smith had the most runs while Denis George had the best bowling figures.The victory and performance of Smith came two days after the death of his father.Caribbean News Now Share Share Tweetcenter_img 39 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Sharelast_img read more

De Guzman double kills off Canaries

first_img The jitters struck for the Swans straight after the break. Skipper Ashley Williams had to clear a Bradley Johnson shot from the goal line and Michel Vorm struggled to deal with a downward header from Ricky van Wolfswinkel. Shelvey went close after some great interplay down the left, then he turned provider when he set De Guzman away from inside his half, racing towards goal. His lay-off to Bony was fired over, but reminded the visitors of the perils of committing too many players forward in search of a goal. With 20 minutes to go the Swans began to open up, threading cute passes and forcing some scrambled defence from the Canaries. Michu made way for Pablo Hernandez to a standing ovation. He is still not back to his best but appears to be improving with every minute of action after his long injury lay-off. Leon Britton – making his 400th league start for Swansea in a career that has spanned all four divisions – beavered away in midfield all day. Routledge p ut the result beyond doubt when he ran behind the defence and calmly finished off a Shelvey through-ball. Another Bony back-heel led to confusion in the Canaries’ defence, causing skipper Sebastien Bassong to strike the ball against his own post. Chris Hughton’s Canaries could not muster any consolation as the clock ticked down to Swansea’s fifth home league win in the last 21. Meanwhile, Norwich’s away woes continue, having picked up only two points from the last 24 on the road. The first chance fell to Michu in the eighth minute. The Spanish marksman latched onto a pass from Angel Rangel just outside the box but dragged his effort wide. There were plenty of lateral passes but little penetration from the Swans in the early stages as Norwich stood firm and held their rigid 4-4-2 formation. But as the half wore on the cracks opened up. Michu again shot wide in the 24th minute and a low save from Canaries goalkeeper John Ruddy, followed by an urgent clearance from midfielder Wes Hoolahan, was needed to repel Routledge during the next attack. De Guzman bagged a deserved opener on the half-hour. It was midfielder Jonjo Shelvey – involved in most of his side’s good work – who delivered the initial cross from the right. When the visitors’ defence failed to clear under pressure from Michu and Routledge, De Guzman was there to pounce and rifled home from 18 yards for his fourth league goal of the season. Sublime skill from Wilfried Bony laid the second on a plate for De Guzman after 38 minutes. As the midfielder played it into feet there was no clear route to goal. But the Ivorian top-scorer showed he can create as well as bang in the goals by performing an audacious drag over and back-heel to return the ball to De Guzman, who finished coolly, off the post. The Canaries had little to show for their efforts in the first half – a couple of corners and a tame shot from full-back Russell Martin their only signs of promise. Press Association A brace from Jonathan de Guzman fired Swansea to their first win in 10 games and gave them some much-needed breathing space above the relegation scrap. The Welsh side had never beaten Norwich in their five Premier League meetings before this match. But two clinical finishes from the Dutchman plus a 75th-minute goal from winger Wayne Routledge banished that bogey at the Liberty Stadium. A 3-0 victory was the least Garry Monk’s side deserved as they dominated both halves and, but for some jittery moments after the break, never looked in trouble. last_img read more

Man hospitalised after accident on quad bike

first_imgA man was airlifted to hospital following an incident involving a quad bike. The incident occurred near Donegal Town yesterday.The Irish Coast Guard said it was alerted to the incident at approximately 2.30pm. The Irish Coast Guard explained that at approximately 2.30pm the Marine Rescue Sub Centre in Malin was alerted to a quad casualty incident involving a male.The incident took place to the east of Donegal Town in an area that was described as “inaccessible”.As a result, the R118 coast guard helicopter was dispatched to ‘medevac’ the casualty to Sligo airport for onward transportation to hospital by ambulance.His condition has not yet been released. Man hospitalised after accident on quad bike was last modified: May 17th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:accidentDonegal TownhospitalquadRESCUE 118last_img read more

Suzuki cars back in South Africa

first_img27 February 2008Japan’s Suzuki Motor Corporation has announced that it will resume selling its range of cars on the South African market from June, after an absence of four years, and has established a subsidiary company, Suzuki Auto South Africa, to act as its importer and distributor.While an agreement to distribute Suzuki vehicles through General Motors’ dealer network came to an end in 2004, the company says feasibility studies indicated that an expanded range of vehicles being sold by a dedicated dealership network would be well received in South Africa.In a statement earlier this month, Suzuki said the projected growth in the South African economy, and particularly automotive sales, had also prompted it to establish a subsidiary company in the country.“Suzuki Auto South Africa has been jointly established between Suzuki Motor Corporation, who owns 85% of the equity in the newly formed company, and Suzuki South Africa, the authorised importer and distributor of Suzuki motorcycles and outboard motors,” the statement reads.Kazuyuki Yamashita, who has been involved in sales and marketing in several international positions with Suzuki Motor Corporation, has been appointed MD for Suzuki Auto South Africa.“We are confident that the Suzuki automotive brand will do very well in the South African market and are looking forward to introducing the exciting Suzuki Swift hatchback, SX4 Crossover Vehicle, Jimny and Grand Vitara range of Sport Utility Vehicles to this market during 2008,” Yamashita said.“We intend to expand the model line-up during 2009 through importing strategic models from international assembly plants.”He added that dealerships would be established in most of South Africa’s major centres by mid-year, and that the buying public could expect to see the first Suzuki vehicles on the showroom floors by June.SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT CYRIL RAMAPHOSA AT THE INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION (ITU) TELECOM WORLD 2018

first_imgRead the full text of the address by South African President, Cyril Ramaphosa at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Telcom World 2018 on Monday 10 September at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Convention Centre, eThekweni.Programme Director, Minister Nomvula Mokonyane,Acting Premier of KwaZulu-Natal, Mr Sihle Zikalala,Executive Mayor of Ethekwini, Ms Zandile Gumede,Ministers and Deputy Ministers,Secretary General of the ITU, Mr Houlin Zhao,AU Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy, Dr Amani Abou-Zeid,Members of the diplomatic corps,Distinguished delegates,Esteemed guests,Ladies and Gentlemen,It is a great privilege to address this opening session of the ITU Telecom World 2018.It is an honour as the government and the people of South Africa to host this event for the first time on the African continent.For us, the ITU Telecom World provides a guide to the future.The deliberations that take place here concern the economy and society of tomorrow that we are building today.We are at the dawn of a digital revolution that will reshape the way we work, they way we live and the way we relate to each other.Technological change is proceeding at a pace far greater than anything humanity has experienced before.It is through forums like this that we are able not only to anticipate technological change, but also to harness it for the advancement of humanity.It is through bodies like the International Telecommunication Union that we craft a digital agenda for inclusivity, sustainability and development.We have the means and the responsibility to direct the evolution of information and communications technology towards the achievement of a better life for all the peoples of the world.It is our task to ensure that the 4th Industrial Revolution improves the human condition and that no one is left behind.It is our task to ensure that this digital revolution responds to the needs of the developing world.It must assist in overcoming unemployment, not exacerbate it.It must bridge the digital divide, not widen it.It must employ the latest in communications technology and data analytics to solve some of the world’s greatest development challenges.The decisions we make now, as individual countries and as a global collective, will determine whether the 4th Industrial Revolution is the opportunity that so many people anticipateor the threat that so many people fear.As our economies become increasingly dependent on information and communication techology, it is critical that governments work more closely with industry to maximise the value of digital innovations.It is equally critical that both government and industry develop effective collaborative relationships with the communities they are both expected to serve.It is such relationships that are required, for example, for the accelerated rollout of broadband in areas that are generally seen asnot being economically viable.And yet, the presence of broadband in such areas is vital for the viability of the economy.The rapid expansion of broadband reach and accessibility is a priority in South Africa because it is a key determinant of economic inclusion.There are currently 20 million South Africans who do not use the internet, for a range of reasons such as unaffordable data prices, lack of internet-enabled devices and lack of access.Yet, about 87% of households in South Africa have access to mobile phones, presenting us with a great opportunity to overcome digital exclusion and to drive inclusive growth and innovation.Government has recently decided to accelerate the licensing of the radio frequency spectrum in the 2.6Ghz, 700Mhz and 800Mhz bands to hasten the growth of mobile communications.We have finalised consultations with the telecommunications industry and other stakeholders to ensure allocation of spectrum reduces barriers to entry, promotes competition and reduces costs to consumers.Following a Cabinet decision last month, our regulator ICASA is now preparing to licenceavailable high demand spectrum.In addition, we have begun work in preparation for 5G spectrum licensing as part of our efforts to build a smarter digital economy.Earlier this year, we announced plans toestablish a Digital Industrial Revolution Commission to ensure we are in a position to seize the opportunities of the rapid advances in information and communication technology.We are informed by research that associates investment in ICTs with such economic benefits as higher productivity, lower costs, new economic opportunities, job creation, innovation and increased trade.Information and communication technology also helps provide better services in health andeducation and strengthens social cohesion.Our work in this area coincides with agreement on the establishment of an African Continental Free Trade Area, which will create a single market of over a billion people.At the Plenipotentiary of the African Telecommunications Union held last month in Nairobi, South Africa was mandated to lead a five-country committee to coordinate the development of the continental response to the 4th Industrial Revolution.This is a task that we undertake in support of the African Union’s Agenda 2063, which seeks a continent with diverse and inclusive economies,advanced infrastructure and a skilled and capable population.In promoting this vision, we see a key role for technology.It was precisely this – the developmental role of technology – that South Africa’s founding President Nelson Mandela affirmed when he addressed the 7th World Telecommunications Conference and Exhibition in Geneva in 1995.It was the first year that South Africa participated in the global event as a full member of the ITU.In his speech, President Mandela said it was crucial for South Africa and the entire African continent to be part of the organisation that would drive international policy, technological development, cooperation and skills transfer.Now, in the year of the centenary of his birth, let us be guided by his vision of a world in which everyone is connected, not only by technology, but also by a common humanity.Since rejoining the ITU, South Africa has worked with other member countries to advocate for the transformation of the institution and the entire global communications landscape to promote equality and inclusivity.In the World Summit on Information Society,held in Geneva in 2003 and Tunis in 2005, we advocated for a people-centred and development-oriented information society, where citizens’ lives are enhanced by ICTs and member states are recognised on an equal footing.We continue to champion the internet as a tool for social and economic development.We support universal broadband and universal broadcasting to connect all citizens and ensure that they have access to information.Most recently, we have advocated for the safety of ICT infrastructure and secure use by all online.Important to Africa and developing countries is the need for countries to share manufacturing and localisation opportunities to allow equal access and shared growth throughout the world.We support equitable access to global ICT resources such as orbital slots, satellites and governance of the internet.Distinguished Guests,Ladies and Gentlemen,We firmly believe that there is a strong correlation between innovation and growth.South Africa recently embarked on an investment drive to attract $100 billion in new investment in the country over the next five years.This is part of a broader effort to set the economy on a new path of growth, employment and transformation.We will be holding an Investment Conference on 25-27 October, where we will showcase the country’s lucrative investment offerings.We are determined that the ICT sector be an integral part of this investment drive, with a focus on infrastructure investment, e-commerce, local manufacturing of equipment, and innovation.South Africa has demonstrated its capabilities in the development and deployment of information and communications technology.We expect that the Investment Conference will help to demonstrate the country’s great potential.In conclusion, we are certain that Telecom World 2018 will produce innovative solutions tosocietal challenges and establish a platform for greater inclusive growth.I thank our industry partners and state owned companies that heeded the call to support government in hosting this event for the first time on African soil.Special thanks to the Secretary-General, the entire leadership and officials of the ITU for having shown confidence in our country to host this event.To our guests from across the continent and across the world, we are honoured and delighted to welcome you to our shores.It is my pleasure to officially declare the ITU Telecom World 2018 open.I thank you.last_img read more

Marital Adjustment After Deployment

first_imgBy Rachel Dorman, MS & Heidi Radunovich, PhDMilitary members can face a number of challenges when reintegrating back into the family after deployment. Some challenges may include changes in previous roles and responsibilities in their marriage, finding their place among friends and family, and civilian activities that evoke wartime memories. Due to the stressful events, such as exposure to combat during deployment, reintegration can be more difficult for some. Foran, Wright, and Woods (2013) sought to learn more about how combat exposure impacts marital relationships among military members who recently returned from deployment.Martial Adjustment [Flickr, 4th BCT Deployment by Fort Bragg, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015The researchers examined how combat exposure, mental health symptoms, and aggression impacted service personnel’s intent to divorce or separate within nine months post-deployment. Participants included 194 married active duty personnel who had returned from a 15-month deployment to Iraq in 2007-2008. Participants took a survey on base four months post-deployment, and again nine months post-deployment. The survey contained measures for combat experiences, depressive symptoms, PTSD symptoms, intent to divorce or separate, relationship psychological aggression, general aggression, and marital distress. The researchers found that at four months post-deployment over one-third (37%) of service members reported marital problems. During the same time period, the researchers also found that over 43% of participants reported psychological aggression against their partner within the last month. Marital distress, relationship aggression, combat exposure, and PTSD symptoms related to re-experiencing events were all associated with higher intent to divorce or separate. Participants who reported high levels of marital distress and also experienced high levels of combat exposure were much more likely to report intent to divorce or separate nine months post-deployment than those who only had high levels of marital distress, or just combat exposure. This held true even when controlling for PTSD symptoms.Martial Adjustment 2 [Flickr, 130922-Z-OU450-266 by North Carolina National Guard, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015Practitioners who work with service members and their families should be aware that service members who have experienced high levels of combat are at particularly high risk for divorce or separation if they are already experiencing marital distress. This could be due to symptoms and behaviors that the service member is showing to the spouse, as well as their own challenges in handling stress. Because they are particularly vulnerable, it is recommended that married military service members who have experienced deployment participate in couple-based programs to reduce depressive symptoms and marital distress, and also to focus on education to reduce the stigma of seeking treatment when needed. For more information about military couples cans be found in the below blogs previously published by MFLN Family Development:Military Couples, Infidelity, and Marriage Education ProgramsCouple Separations: Strengthening & ResilienceInfidelity and Military Couples: Risks & EffectsMilitary Couples vs. Civilian CouplesResource Discovery: Military Family Lifestyle Survey ReportRelationship Stability: What Helps and HindersResearch on Military Enrichment Programs References[1] Foran, H., Wright, K., & Wood, M. (2013). Do combat exposure and post-deployment mental health influence intent to divorce? Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 32(9), p. 917 – 938. doi: 10.1521/jscp.2013.32.9.917This post was written by Rachel Dorman, M.S. and Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

Mothers tell you how

first_imgVatsala Kaul Banerjee is the editorial director of Children’s & Reference Books, Hatchette India. She has also had stints in advertising and print and is a mother of two – here she talks about how dealing with one’s child’s setbacks is more about fixing oneself than her.You know this prayer:”God, give us grace to acceptwith serenity,The things that cannot bechanged,Courage to change the thingswhich should be changed,And the wisdom to distinguishone from the other…”I didn’t think of this, Reinhold Niebuhr did, and he would’ve made a good mother. After 10 years of seesaw parenting – sometimes up, sometimes down, and sometimes middling – I can say with certainty that dealing with your child’s setbacks is more about fixing yourself than your child… Or it should be.Let’s start with an easy quiz. Tick the ones you think are your child’s setbacks:Poor marksWearing glassesPhysical or behavioural handicapNot being an eager performerThe ones you tick (or don’t) will help you figure out what kind of parent you are. If you ticked all five, I’d say that you have very high, probably unrealistic, expectations from your child. If you ticked one, then I’d say you’re likely to be a happy parent who allows her child his/her imperfections and weaknesses. And if you ticked two-three options, you’d be able to deal well with most of your child’s setbacks.I come of a mother who never let me think that losing vision in one eye at the age of two, and being faced with the prospect of going blind, and then having an extremely ugly squint till I was a teenager, was a “setback”. She didn’t go about it in a feature story “How I went about raising my daughter’s self-esteem” type of way; she just treated me normally and I learned to deal with it. Later, when the squint was fixed, but never quite completely, boyfriends would tell me how beautiful my eyes were, and I never doubted it. It’s all about perception, isn’t it?advertisementSo, when one of my daughters needed glasses at the age of five, sure I was concerned, but more about how she would deal with sports until she was old enough for lenses, and not that she had glasses “already!”. She also hated being on stage – her young, tattooed guitar teacher said it was cool that she didn’t want to learn songs to perform and would rather learn the chords first. It’s strange that I birthed a shy child, but there’s no one quite like her, and that’s fine with me. But of course, when she does badly in tests, I get upset because she knew everything – I’m human, after all, and I give her all the spiel about “doing your best”. And, of course, I hurt when her best friend suddenly decides to dump her at the behest of her mother, because I know my little girl is bewildered by this sudden and cruel change of heart, and I sit down and explain why some people can suddenly go off colour. It’s all part of the life deal. It’s going to happen a lot. Do the run up, hop, step and jump over it.What I would think could be serious setbacks in my children:If they didn’t giggle uncontrollably at nothing at all.If they did not think that 16-yearold Justin Bieber is the best singer in the world.If they did not want to learn new things in life.If they had only one friend.If they thought I know everything better than they do.If they thought everything can be found on/solved by the Internet.If they didn’t still make handmade cards for birthdays.If they didn’t run to get the first rights to hold the maid’s little baby.If they blame things that go wrong on other people all the time.If they say “That’s your problem!” or “So what can I do?”.I know what’s the right thing to do, and I try to get there, sometimes slip-sliding away, sometimes getting there. Every parent has to set the measures for their children – and themselves. Love is more important than anything else, and how to fix a problem and get over a disappointment is the key to waking up smiling next morning, ready to kiss life with a loud smack – and your children, too!Here are my ways of smiling when my children suffer a setback:Read to them or have them read stories of disappointments and achievements. No great person ever became that without both.advertisementHow can you explain the situation to your child so that he doesn’t think it’s a matter of life and death? Figure this out. We’re so involved in making our children smart, that we forget that they are still small and vulnerable.Don’t refuse help and advice, but don’t get pressurised by other parents. Their lives are different; their children are different, and their values may be entirely different, too. Live by yours.Don’t let other people treat your child with pity or sympathy. Tell them politely, and if they don’t get it, talk plain. Get the point across firmly.Accept the situation. Re-align priorities. What’s more important? That your child does something and be unhappy, or not do it and be happy?Think back to your childhood when making decisions for your child.Don’t be ashamed of your child’s weaknesses. Only if you know what’s wrong, you can decide if you want to make it better – and how.Show love. Hug, kiss and say it’s going to be all right; and if it isn’t going to be all right, it’s still all right – we’ll find another way, tomorrow is another day.Hows to tackle discipline and foodPriya Shirali, mother of two, is a writer. She believes that children should be given roots to keep them emotionally grounded and strong, and wings to let them soar. She tells us how she disciplines her children and makes them eat right?The best piece of advice I received as a young mother was this: when your baby is 4-5 months old, introduce her to all the possible tastes by giving her a small amount of curd, orange juice, honey, vinegar and so on. I did that with my daughter and realised that she was far more accepting of assorted tastes than most babies, who like only sweet food. Today, as a healthy 10-year-old, she eats baigan ka bharta as happily as French fries. My son, who I didn’t introduce to all the tastes at that age, is a fuss pot. I have to constantly think up ways to get him to eat his vegetables. So, I boil and grind or grate vegetables such as spinach and carrots, mash them and add them to the flour to make parathas. His disinterest in vegetables also prompts me to add ladyfinger and potatoes to mutton – sometimes I even cook rice in vegetable stock.As a family, we eat a balanced diet, and since children adopt food habits from their immediate family, my children do eat healthy. Salad, curd, fruits and healthy munchies, such as roasted wheat, are a regular part of our food. Having said that, I also give them a rather free hand when it comes to junk food – they eat wafers, and we eat out once every week, often at a restaurant of their choice. Unlike some health-fixated families, we do not resist “the Clown, the King and the Colonel” of the American fastfood empire.advertisementThe trick is to balance things out over a week. Don’t try and make every meal healthy. And don’t make eating healthy an oppressive thing. Food should be enjoyed and eaten happily for it to nourish the body. Otherwise, you could eat the most nutritious diet and still not benefit from it.When it comes to disciplining my children, I follow the “be loving, be polite, be firm” maxim. Today, parents often abdicate their parental responsibility to be their child’s friend, but I don’t believe in that. My child will have many friends in life, but only one mother. So I am friendly, but I have certain rules about behaviour, bedtime, TV and computer time, all of which have been set after a discussion with the children and keeping in mind what is best for them. But once we have decided on something, we follow it. Of course, the rules are not set in stone, and are changed as they grow older.How to tackle adolescence Minakshi S Desai, born in Nairobi, Kenya, is an interior designer and a freelance writer. She dabbles in craft, painting and pottery and loves animals. She is the mother of a teenager and tells us how to adjust with stubborn, adolescent behaviour?Like most mothers, I was obsessed with numbers and percentages. And like most 15-year-olds, my daughter Romi hated studies. Studying through the night before the exams with almost the entire syllabus to be finished was a routine affair.My temper and her stubbornness raged on neck and neck, her stubbornness winning hands down. At the end of my tether, I visited the school counsellor for help. At my sanctimonious best, I described my daughter’s behaviour, confident that the counselor would set her straight and peace would once again reign in a home that had become a bedlam. I was dumbstruck when the counsellor gave Romi a clean chit and suggested that I take a few sessions of therapy instead! To say that I was affronted is an understatement; more so because Romi was finding it hard to control her smirk.It took some doing, but I finally dragged my feet back to the counsellor. Just two sessions of therapy changed my perspective on the situation and the results were noticeable immediately. I continued with the sessions, egged on by the changes I perceived in my daughter who looked happy and relaxed. A few weeks down the line, Romi’s grades improved and though she still had to be coaxed to study, she didn’t put up much of a fight.I learnt the hard way that I was unconsciously transferring my insecurity and fear of failure onto her. I also learnt that studying more didn’t necessarily mean better marks; it could be counterproductive too! We started working as a team rather than adversaries. The time tables and charts were pasted on her cupboard. She thrived under my positive feedback and passed her ICSE exams with 85 percent; and later, her ISC with 81 percent. Today, at 18, she is a bubbly teenager, preparing for college.Help your child with studies:Set a workable time table as it helps organise your child. Induce them to stick to the plan by showing appreciation when they follow it.A 30-minute break every two hours of studying makes the child more productive.There is no need to cut the cable connection. A bit of TV viewing is just the thing your child needs when she is taking a break.The most important thing to remember is that the world isn’t going to end if your child doesn’t score well in exams.Every child who scores 90 percent in school may not be successful in life and a child who scores badly is not a failure in life.Be the change you want, and everything else that you want to change will fall into place.Parents are like tugboats; they guide the ship (or their child) into the harbour for safe anchorage.How to tackle weight “issues”Vandana Malhotra is a Delhi-based writer. Mother to an eight-year-old, she tells us how to keep an underweight child active and energeticOne of the most common complaints among Indian mothers is that their child is a fussy, picky eater who simply does not pack in enough nourishment. As I have learnt from experience, most of such talk is sheer bunkum because when you look at the child, you find that she looks perfectly healthy. When such talk gets too much, I simply point at my daughter to shut them up. At an energetic eight years, my daughter Urja only weighs 15kg. Rather shocking when you state it baldly like that, but true. Not only is she fussy about what she eats, quantity is a problem too. If I can get her to eat one chapatti at a meal with just about a half portion each of dal, veggies and dahi, I consider it an achievement.That Urja is a slow gainer became apparent at about three years of age. Though her height and head circumference were well within the average range, her weight just didn’t keep up. Her paediatrician ran a slew of tests to determine if she had any underlying chronic disorder. These included simple blood, stool and urine checks to rule out anaemia, thalassemia, thyroid, mal-absorption of nutrients and even loss of proteins through urine. Thankfully, all the tests turned out negative and she didn’t suffer from lactose or gluten intolerance either.Experts today agree that the growth potential and the growth rate of children are programmed in their DNA. Since both my husband and I were thin as children, Urja, in all probability, takes after us. The genetic factor is compounded by the fact that she’s a small eater whose calorie intake is lower than it should be. But our paediatrician assures us that as long as Urja is healthy and active, her weight should not worry us unduly. Artificial fat and protein supplements for weight gain are a big no-no as the first can affect the heart adversely and the latter, the kidneys. We’ve simply been advised to wait till Urja hits puberty, the next growth spurt.In the meantime, our job is to make Urja eat calorie-and-energy-dense food, such as cheese, pasta, nuts, dry fruit and lots of icecream. She doesn’t cooperate much but instead of forcing food down her throat and putting her back up, we simply let her eat the amount she’s comfortable with. I generally go with the smaller meals and frequent snacks formula. As my sister-in-law, an obstetrician, observes, it’s a whole lot easier for parents to encourage their child to eat than to say no if they’re growing obese.If your child is underweight, her diet should include this:Whole cream milk, fruit shakes and icecream.Energy and calorie-rich fruits such as coconut, mango and banana.Dense carbohydrates such as wheat, rice and corn.Cheese and butter.Eggs, beans and legumes for protein.Dry fruits.last_img read more