Jon Gruden hopes to re-sign Raiders MVP Jared Cook in free agency

first_imgALAMEDA — Jon Gruden isn’t always transparent with the media, most recently claiming he was surprised by general manager Reggie McKenzie’s inevitable firing. Yet he left no room for interpretation when declaring his team’s best player after upsetting the Steelers.“Jared was awesome,” Gruden said of tight end Jared Cook. “He clearly is our MVP. In my opinion, he is phenomenal.”Cook caught seven passes for a team-high 116 yards in the Raiders’ 24-21 win over AFC North-leading Pittsburgh. He …last_img read more

National Trail FFA advances Parli Pro teams to state competition

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Trail-MVCTC FFA Chapters Advanced and Novice parliamentary procedure teams recently competed in the districts parliamentary procedure CDE contest at National Trail High School. The advanced team includes Mallory Nugent, Gracie Jones, Hunter Lee, Lily Carpenter, Erika Gallaher, Rachael Kimball and Macel Stowers. The novice team includes Raven Tout, Taylor Davis, Austin Knapp, Abbey Rodefer. Noah Phillips, Ricky Cole, Mark Armstrong, Trena Caldwell and Lila Pegg. The chapter is very proud of the team’s results and all the hard work they put into the preparation for this event as they now are state bound.This CDE requires FFA members to conduct a business meeting using parliamentary law according to the guidelines outlined in Robert’s Rules of Order. FFA members are also tested on their knowledge of parliamentary law. They are graded based on public speaking, official dress, completeness and accuracy, format of the secretary’s minutes, grammar, style and legibility.The two teams performed well during the sub districts contest as well at Eaton High School. The National Trail-MVCTC Novice Parliamentary Procedure team received the first award and the Advance Parliamentary Procedure Team received the second award which qualified them for the district contest. With their recent performance at district contest, National Trail- MVCTC FFA’s two parliamentary procedure teams will be heading to the state contest for a 3rd time within recent years.We encourage any FFA members as well as community members to attend our events and help make a difference in our community. The National Trail-MVCTC FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to over 160 student members at National Trail High School.last_img read more

Mothers tell you how

first_imgVatsala Kaul Banerjee is the editorial director of Children’s & Reference Books, Hatchette India. She has also had stints in advertising and print and is a mother of two – here she talks about how dealing with one’s child’s setbacks is more about fixing oneself than her.You know this prayer:”God, give us grace to acceptwith serenity,The things that cannot bechanged,Courage to change the thingswhich should be changed,And the wisdom to distinguishone from the other…”I didn’t think of this, Reinhold Niebuhr did, and he would’ve made a good mother. After 10 years of seesaw parenting – sometimes up, sometimes down, and sometimes middling – I can say with certainty that dealing with your child’s setbacks is more about fixing yourself than your child… Or it should be.Let’s start with an easy quiz. Tick the ones you think are your child’s setbacks:Poor marksWearing glassesPhysical or behavioural handicapNot being an eager performerThe ones you tick (or don’t) will help you figure out what kind of parent you are. If you ticked all five, I’d say that you have very high, probably unrealistic, expectations from your child. If you ticked one, then I’d say you’re likely to be a happy parent who allows her child his/her imperfections and weaknesses. And if you ticked two-three options, you’d be able to deal well with most of your child’s setbacks.I come of a mother who never let me think that losing vision in one eye at the age of two, and being faced with the prospect of going blind, and then having an extremely ugly squint till I was a teenager, was a “setback”. She didn’t go about it in a feature story “How I went about raising my daughter’s self-esteem” type of way; she just treated me normally and I learned to deal with it. Later, when the squint was fixed, but never quite completely, boyfriends would tell me how beautiful my eyes were, and I never doubted it. It’s all about perception, isn’t it?advertisementSo, when one of my daughters needed glasses at the age of five, sure I was concerned, but more about how she would deal with sports until she was old enough for lenses, and not that she had glasses “already!”. She also hated being on stage – her young, tattooed guitar teacher said it was cool that she didn’t want to learn songs to perform and would rather learn the chords first. It’s strange that I birthed a shy child, but there’s no one quite like her, and that’s fine with me. But of course, when she does badly in tests, I get upset because she knew everything – I’m human, after all, and I give her all the spiel about “doing your best”. And, of course, I hurt when her best friend suddenly decides to dump her at the behest of her mother, because I know my little girl is bewildered by this sudden and cruel change of heart, and I sit down and explain why some people can suddenly go off colour. It’s all part of the life deal. It’s going to happen a lot. Do the run up, hop, step and jump over it.What I would think could be serious setbacks in my children:If they didn’t giggle uncontrollably at nothing at all.If they did not think that 16-yearold Justin Bieber is the best singer in the world.If they did not want to learn new things in life.If they had only one friend.If they thought I know everything better than they do.If they thought everything can be found on/solved by the Internet.If they didn’t still make handmade cards for birthdays.If they didn’t run to get the first rights to hold the maid’s little baby.If they blame things that go wrong on other people all the time.If they say “That’s your problem!” or “So what can I do?”.I know what’s the right thing to do, and I try to get there, sometimes slip-sliding away, sometimes getting there. Every parent has to set the measures for their children – and themselves. Love is more important than anything else, and how to fix a problem and get over a disappointment is the key to waking up smiling next morning, ready to kiss life with a loud smack – and your children, too!Here are my ways of smiling when my children suffer a setback:Read to them or have them read stories of disappointments and achievements. No great person ever became that without both.advertisementHow can you explain the situation to your child so that he doesn’t think it’s a matter of life and death? Figure this out. We’re so involved in making our children smart, that we forget that they are still small and vulnerable.Don’t refuse help and advice, but don’t get pressurised by other parents. Their lives are different; their children are different, and their values may be entirely different, too. Live by yours.Don’t let other people treat your child with pity or sympathy. Tell them politely, and if they don’t get it, talk plain. Get the point across firmly.Accept the situation. Re-align priorities. What’s more important? That your child does something and be unhappy, or not do it and be happy?Think back to your childhood when making decisions for your child.Don’t be ashamed of your child’s weaknesses. Only if you know what’s wrong, you can decide if you want to make it better – and how.Show love. Hug, kiss and say it’s going to be all right; and if it isn’t going to be all right, it’s still all right – we’ll find another way, tomorrow is another day.Hows to tackle discipline and foodPriya Shirali, mother of two, is a writer. She believes that children should be given roots to keep them emotionally grounded and strong, and wings to let them soar. She tells us how she disciplines her children and makes them eat right?The best piece of advice I received as a young mother was this: when your baby is 4-5 months old, introduce her to all the possible tastes by giving her a small amount of curd, orange juice, honey, vinegar and so on. I did that with my daughter and realised that she was far more accepting of assorted tastes than most babies, who like only sweet food. Today, as a healthy 10-year-old, she eats baigan ka bharta as happily as French fries. My son, who I didn’t introduce to all the tastes at that age, is a fuss pot. I have to constantly think up ways to get him to eat his vegetables. So, I boil and grind or grate vegetables such as spinach and carrots, mash them and add them to the flour to make parathas. His disinterest in vegetables also prompts me to add ladyfinger and potatoes to mutton – sometimes I even cook rice in vegetable stock.As a family, we eat a balanced diet, and since children adopt food habits from their immediate family, my children do eat healthy. Salad, curd, fruits and healthy munchies, such as roasted wheat, are a regular part of our food. Having said that, I also give them a rather free hand when it comes to junk food – they eat wafers, and we eat out once every week, often at a restaurant of their choice. Unlike some health-fixated families, we do not resist “the Clown, the King and the Colonel” of the American fastfood empire.advertisementThe trick is to balance things out over a week. Don’t try and make every meal healthy. And don’t make eating healthy an oppressive thing. Food should be enjoyed and eaten happily for it to nourish the body. Otherwise, you could eat the most nutritious diet and still not benefit from it.When it comes to disciplining my children, I follow the “be loving, be polite, be firm” maxim. Today, parents often abdicate their parental responsibility to be their child’s friend, but I don’t believe in that. My child will have many friends in life, but only one mother. So I am friendly, but I have certain rules about behaviour, bedtime, TV and computer time, all of which have been set after a discussion with the children and keeping in mind what is best for them. But once we have decided on something, we follow it. Of course, the rules are not set in stone, and are changed as they grow older.How to tackle adolescence Minakshi S Desai, born in Nairobi, Kenya, is an interior designer and a freelance writer. She dabbles in craft, painting and pottery and loves animals. She is the mother of a teenager and tells us how to adjust with stubborn, adolescent behaviour?Like most mothers, I was obsessed with numbers and percentages. And like most 15-year-olds, my daughter Romi hated studies. Studying through the night before the exams with almost the entire syllabus to be finished was a routine affair.My temper and her stubbornness raged on neck and neck, her stubbornness winning hands down. At the end of my tether, I visited the school counsellor for help. At my sanctimonious best, I described my daughter’s behaviour, confident that the counselor would set her straight and peace would once again reign in a home that had become a bedlam. I was dumbstruck when the counsellor gave Romi a clean chit and suggested that I take a few sessions of therapy instead! To say that I was affronted is an understatement; more so because Romi was finding it hard to control her smirk.It took some doing, but I finally dragged my feet back to the counsellor. Just two sessions of therapy changed my perspective on the situation and the results were noticeable immediately. I continued with the sessions, egged on by the changes I perceived in my daughter who looked happy and relaxed. A few weeks down the line, Romi’s grades improved and though she still had to be coaxed to study, she didn’t put up much of a fight.I learnt the hard way that I was unconsciously transferring my insecurity and fear of failure onto her. I also learnt that studying more didn’t necessarily mean better marks; it could be counterproductive too! We started working as a team rather than adversaries. The time tables and charts were pasted on her cupboard. She thrived under my positive feedback and passed her ICSE exams with 85 percent; and later, her ISC with 81 percent. Today, at 18, she is a bubbly teenager, preparing for college.Help your child with studies:Set a workable time table as it helps organise your child. Induce them to stick to the plan by showing appreciation when they follow it.A 30-minute break every two hours of studying makes the child more productive.There is no need to cut the cable connection. A bit of TV viewing is just the thing your child needs when she is taking a break.The most important thing to remember is that the world isn’t going to end if your child doesn’t score well in exams.Every child who scores 90 percent in school may not be successful in life and a child who scores badly is not a failure in life.Be the change you want, and everything else that you want to change will fall into place.Parents are like tugboats; they guide the ship (or their child) into the harbour for safe anchorage.How to tackle weight “issues”Vandana Malhotra is a Delhi-based writer. Mother to an eight-year-old, she tells us how to keep an underweight child active and energeticOne of the most common complaints among Indian mothers is that their child is a fussy, picky eater who simply does not pack in enough nourishment. As I have learnt from experience, most of such talk is sheer bunkum because when you look at the child, you find that she looks perfectly healthy. When such talk gets too much, I simply point at my daughter to shut them up. At an energetic eight years, my daughter Urja only weighs 15kg. Rather shocking when you state it baldly like that, but true. Not only is she fussy about what she eats, quantity is a problem too. If I can get her to eat one chapatti at a meal with just about a half portion each of dal, veggies and dahi, I consider it an achievement.That Urja is a slow gainer became apparent at about three years of age. Though her height and head circumference were well within the average range, her weight just didn’t keep up. Her paediatrician ran a slew of tests to determine if she had any underlying chronic disorder. These included simple blood, stool and urine checks to rule out anaemia, thalassemia, thyroid, mal-absorption of nutrients and even loss of proteins through urine. Thankfully, all the tests turned out negative and she didn’t suffer from lactose or gluten intolerance either.Experts today agree that the growth potential and the growth rate of children are programmed in their DNA. Since both my husband and I were thin as children, Urja, in all probability, takes after us. The genetic factor is compounded by the fact that she’s a small eater whose calorie intake is lower than it should be. But our paediatrician assures us that as long as Urja is healthy and active, her weight should not worry us unduly. Artificial fat and protein supplements for weight gain are a big no-no as the first can affect the heart adversely and the latter, the kidneys. We’ve simply been advised to wait till Urja hits puberty, the next growth spurt.In the meantime, our job is to make Urja eat calorie-and-energy-dense food, such as cheese, pasta, nuts, dry fruit and lots of icecream. She doesn’t cooperate much but instead of forcing food down her throat and putting her back up, we simply let her eat the amount she’s comfortable with. I generally go with the smaller meals and frequent snacks formula. As my sister-in-law, an obstetrician, observes, it’s a whole lot easier for parents to encourage their child to eat than to say no if they’re growing obese.If your child is underweight, her diet should include this:Whole cream milk, fruit shakes and icecream.Energy and calorie-rich fruits such as coconut, mango and banana.Dense carbohydrates such as wheat, rice and corn.Cheese and butter.Eggs, beans and legumes for protein.Dry fruits.last_img read more

Mangok Mathiang’s Only Basket Of The Game Was The Game Winner For Louisville Against Virginia

first_imgMangok Mathiang scores game-winner.Louisville just finished its regular season with a 59-57 victory over No. 2 Virginia at the KFC Yum! Center. What made the Cards’ victory so remarkable was just how they got it done.After Virginia’s Malcolm Brogdon put the Cavs up 57-56 on a three-pointer with 16 seconds to play, Louisville had a chance to win it. The Cavaliers doubled UL point guard Terry Rozier off of a pick-and-roll, leaving big man Mangok Mathiang wide-open. Since January 31st, Mathiang had made just one of 16 field goal attempts. He had not attempted a shot in 14 minutes today. Naturally, he swished the foul line jumper off Rozier’s feed like it was second nature.Virginia’s foul-court inbounds pass landed out of bounds, and Rozier finished things off with a free throw. Louisville’s win clinched the No. 4 seed in the upcoming ACC Tournament, and a coveted double-bye into the quarterfinals.All thanks to the 6-foot-10 sophomore from Australia who found his way into the scoring column at the most opportune time.last_img read more

Education Ministry to Deploy ‘Specialist Model’ Experts to 35 Primary Schools

first_img This was announced by the Ministry’s Region One Education Services Director, Dr. Kasan Troupe, who indicated that the initiative will be rolled at the start of the 2018/19 academic year, in September. In order to better prepare students for high school, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information will be assigning experts to 35 primary schools, under a pilot programme titled the ‘Specialist Model’, to assist youngsters experiencing numeracy and literacy challenges to overcome these. Story Highlights She was speaking at the launch of and stakeholder meeting for Quality Education Circle (QEC) 8 at Duhaney Park Gospel Assembly in St. Andrew on Friday (May 4), under the theme ‘Creating Tomorrow Together’. In order to better prepare students for high school, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information will be assigning experts to 35 primary schools, under a pilot programme titled the ‘Specialist Model’, to assist youngsters experiencing numeracy and literacy challenges to overcome these.This was announced by the Ministry’s Region One Education Services Director, Dr. Kasan Troupe, who indicated that the initiative will be rolled at the start of the 2018/19 academic year, in September.She was speaking at the launch of and stakeholder meeting for Quality Education Circle (QEC) 8 at Duhaney Park Gospel Assembly in St. Andrew on Friday (May 4), under the theme ‘Creating Tomorrow Together’.Dr. Troupe said the specialist model programme aims to ensure that student outturns for the Ministry’s numeracy and literacy targets are improved, and that youngsters entering high schools are better equipped and prepared to manage secondary curriculums.She said the project’s implementation was promoted by high school administrators’ concerns about the low levels of mastery in numeracy and literacy recorded by some students leaving Grade Six.“They (high schools) are complaining (about) the quality that they are getting (and that) they (some primary schools students) are not ready for high schools. When we (Ministry) look at the (literacy and) numeracy (scores), we (too) are concerned. (So) we are fixing it from the early stage… (by deploying the) specialists… into our (primary) schools,” she stated.Additionally, Dr. Troupe said the Ministry is targeting a reduction in the student-teacher classroom ratio as a response to the issue.“Gone are the days, where we gave teachers a 1:35 ratio. We are now saying that for every 25 students, you are entitled to an additional teacher (and) we are ready to provide that kind of resource to the system,” she said.The Regional Director also advised that the Ministry will be focusing more on implementing co-teaching in primary schools, to enable more students to get individual attention.“When you look at the countries that are doing well, (such as) Singapore (and) Finland, (their) schools have the culture of co-teaching. So we want to change our culture… (and) we are open to co-teaching,” Dr. Troupe said.QEC concept, which was introduced in 2009 under the Ministry’s aegis, aims to mobilize wide-scale stakeholder participation in the thrust to drive improvements in schools.It entails diverse groups of school administrators creating a learning circle for professionals in education from different levels of the academic system (early childhood, primary, secondary and tertiary) within a particular constituency or geographic zone.Through this concept, educators and other stakeholders meet to: share best practices, discuss challenges, propose solutions, assess progress made and celebrate resulting achievements.QEC 8 comprises 15 schools from the two constituencies, west central and western St. Andrew.last_img read more

New deadline established for competition to design navys new warships

first_imgOTTAWA – Defence companies and shipbuilders competing to design Canada’s new fleet of warships have been given until Nov. 17 to submit their proposals.It’s the third such deadline for the design competition, which is the most recent — and arguably most politically sensitive — phase in the entire $60-billion plan to build 15 warships.Participating firms were originally supposed to have submitted their designs for the new vessels in April, but that deadline was pushed back to June before disappearing entirely.The question now is how many submissions the government will receive, whether any will meet the navy’s requirements, and when the winning design will be selected.Changes to the evaluation process have been made in case none of the designs match up with what Canada needs in its new warships, which will replace the navy’s 12 frigates and three destroyers.Meanwhile, time is of the essence because any delay in the construction schedule would push up costs and force the navy to operate its current warships longer than has been planned.last_img read more

Environment concerns in trade talks with China progressing well says McKenna

first_imgOTTAWA – Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says Canada and China have made good progress on environmental laws and regulations that are among the barriers to launching official free trade talks.McKenna is in China this week as part of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s trade mission, as well as for meetings of her own aimed largely at connecting Canadian clean tech companies with Chinese enterprises.Trudeau left China on Thursday without officially launching the formal free trade talks the two countries have been working towards, citing issues such as gender, the environment and labour among the sticking points.Some Canadian businesses fear less-stringent Chinese regulations and laws could make it harder for them to compete in a free trade environment.McKenna said Canada has made clear the environment is one of its key issues ahead of launching formal free trade talks with China but she doesn’t think it will be a deal breaker.“I think that is an area we’ve made very good progress over the past few years,” she said.“I think that’s one area where I think we have a lot of common ground and I think we can certainly build on that should we enter into formal trade negotiations. I think both Canada and China see that as a win-win.”McKenna believes China is firmly committed to combating climate change and improving environmental protections, pointing to things like its commitment to the Paris climate accord, its recent development of a national emissions market for carbon-heavy industries, and even its kicking off a Chinese national parks system.She says there are two ministerial-level discussions starting up between Canada and China, on climate change and clean technology growth.Intellectual property protections will be among the issues critical for Canadian clean tech companies and are something she says a free trade agreement could help protect.However she noted there are Canadian companies already operating in China with confidence, pointing specifically to Ballard Power, a British Columbia-based fuel cell manufacturer which has an agreement with a Chinese company.McKenna said one of her roles is to help connect clean tech companies from Canada with the Chinese market, noting it can often take government assistance because businesses in China looking for Canadian technology are state-owned.How a free trade agreement would manage the multitude of state-owned enterprises in China is also one of the barriers to a free trade agreement with the world’s most populous nation.Canada is aligning itself with China and the European Union, hoping to be seen as the world’s leaders on environmental policies, particularly when it comes to climate change. The three are trying to help fill the void left by the United States and the climate change-skepticism of President Donald Trump.But Canada’s international climate diplomacy was dealt a blow this week when its climate change ambassador had to resign her post following a family tragedy. Jennifer MacIntyre was only appointed to the job in June, assigned to help McKenna lead Canada’s international push on climate change policy.But in October, her husband suddenly died, which led to MacIntyre’s decision to step away from the high-profile and travel-heavy role so she could be with her two young daughters.“I’m devastated for her personally,” McKenna said. “She was an excellent climate ambassador.”She said the government will look for someone else to fill the role.“That role is critically important because Canada is seen as a leader on climate action,” said McKenna.“We believe that we need to be showing leadership, especially right now, if the U.S. is going to step back, Canada is going to need to step up more.”— follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

Addiction mental illness complicate help for the homeless

first_imgEVERETT, Wash. – This is the lesson that the working-class city of Everett has learned: It takes a community to rescue the hardcore homeless.It takes teams of outreach workers — building relationships with men and women struggling with addiction or untreated mental illness, prodding them to get help. It takes police and other agencies, working together to provide for their needs.And it takes a prosecutor who was tired of managing the unending cycle of homelessness — jail-street-jail-street-jail. Hil Kaman left his job prosecuting the homeless and took up the challenge of finding solutions. For starters, he helped put together a team that would track the 25 most costly and vulnerable cases, and hover over each one individually until he or she was in treatment or housing.“It was when everything else seems to have failed,” said Kaman, who became the city’s public health and safety director 17 months ago.“They’ll bring someone to jail several hundred times, bring someone to the emergency department dozens of times — the (people) resistant to treatment and other alternatives. It was a call to say, ‘Isn’t there anything else that we could do?’”In two years, Everett’s specialized team has found some form of housing for 14 chronically homeless people on its by-name list. The city’s newly formed community outreach enforcement team has gotten more than two dozen people into long-term treatment, primarily using beds paid through a partnership with a non-profit that helps officers deal with the opioid crisis. The city also set up a flex fund that accepts private donations to help pay for motel rooms, bus tickets and other costs.It’s among an array of strategies the city has tried. There is still much work to do: Everett, a city of 110,000 north of Seattle hard-hit by the opioid epidemic, and surrounding Snohomish County saw a 65 per cent jump in people living outside between 2015 and 2017 — one of the largest increases on the West Coast in that period, according to a one-night count earlier this year.The number of unsheltered chronically homeless — those who have been homeless for longer than a year while struggling with a serious mental illness, substance use disorder or physical disability — has grown steadily in the Everett region, more than doubling since 2015. That’s even as the city and county added more supportive housing.Kaman and others say a combination of the opioid epidemic, poverty, lack of unskilled jobs, rising rents, and a shortage of affordable housing have made it even harder for those who fall into homelessness to get out.The problem is not limited to Everett; up and down the West Coast, the high cost of housing has forced thousands of people to live on the streets, a trend that opioids have exacerbated.“These are expensive places to live. It’s expensive for everybody. But the burden falls the hardest on people with the biggest problems,” said Steve Berg, vice-president for programs and policy with the National Alliance to End Homelessness.___In 2011, roughly one in every five opioid-related deaths in Washington state took place in this county. That was the peak, but heroin deaths remain high and deaths from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl are climbing. Last month, county officials partially activated its emergency co-ordinationcentre, typically used for natural disasters, to respond to the opioid crisis. So far this year, health officials have collected 2 million discarded needles.In this former lumber town on scenic Puget Sound, where thousands of workers assemble the newest Boeing airplanes, the crisis had become so dire that this year Everett city officials became among the first to sue the manufacturer of the painkiller OxyContin. The city blames Purdue Pharma for an addiction crisis that has overwhelmed city resources and deepened its homelessness problem.Kaman joined the city’s mayor, police chief, city council members and others who drove to Seattle in September for the city’s successful argument that a federal judge allow its lawsuit against the drug manufacturer to proceed.While that case works through the court, social workers and police officers are fanning out to find people camping under the freeway or living in RVs or the woods and try to connect them to services. Many of them initially deflect treatment, or are too ill to even know they need aid.James McGee, a heroin addict who was living in his minivan on the streets, was among those who got help.The 27-year-old started popping OxyContin prescription pills after a shoulder surgery. When the drug manufacturer changed its formula, he switched to cheaper heroin. He first told himself he would never shoot up. Then he did.“You draw that line, tell yourself you’re not going to pass that, and the next thing, you do,” McGee said. “Then you keep going and going. Before I know it, I’m sticking needles in my body, doing heroin and meth every day.”He eventually lost his job at Costco and his apartment. Shortly after overdosing in the parking lot this summer — and being revived by someone who had overdose-reversal spray at hand — McGee walked into a police station and pleaded for help. Kaitlyn Dowd, a social worker embedded with Everett police, helped connect him to treatment about 100 miles away.Now he’s living in sober housing, more than 90 days clean, working a construction job and attending as many recovery meetings as possible. “I never thought I would taste recovery like this,” he said. “Everyone deserves a second chance.”___For every person who finds a treatment bed or permanent supportive housing, many more wait. Until this summer, when a second facility opened, the county had only 16 publicly funded detox beds for its 785,000 residents. Many must go out of the county, or even state, to find beds.Experts say lack of on-demand treatment and a shortage of appropriate housing to meet specific needs are among the biggest barriers to helping people off the streets. Without permanent housing, advocates and city officials say the homeless will end up back on the street after completing their treatment, repeating the cycle.Kaman said the city has been moving the chronically homeless into private rental units using vouchers, but the region’s low vacancy rate makes that much more challenging.That’s part of the reason Everett is pushing ahead with a low-barrier permanent supportive housing project on city land. The project with Catholic Housing Services will house 65 chronically homeless people without first requiring they be addiction-free or deal with other issues. Residents will have access to mental health, recovery and other services and around-the-clock on-site staff.Studies have found that such housing can save taxpayer money when compared to the costs of serving chronically homeless in emergency rooms, shelters and jails.But so many chronically homeless people in the Everett region are on the waitlist for housing that those units will fill up when it opens in 2019.“Housing is as, if not more, important than any medication” or other services, said Tom Sebastian, CEO of Compass Health, Snohomish County’s largest behavioural health provider.His agency is developing an 84-unit housing project for mentally ill and addicted homeless on a vacant lot in downtown Everett.Compass Health doesn’t typically develop housing, but “because there’s that shortage, we feel a driving sense to step into that breach to do something to help solve that problem,” Sebastian said.For those who can get housing and services, stability can be a lifeline.Garrick Heller, 35, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, said he would be on the streets otherwise.Several years ago, he was involuntary civilly committed because he posed a danger to himself or others. He spent time on the streets, in shelters and eventually at a locked psychiatric facility run by Compass Health. Over time, he gradually moved into more independent living situations run by Compass Health.Now he lives in a small studio apartment, where he sleeps on an air mattress. He gets mental health counselling and other services within blocks of his home. A service helps him pay his bills and rent, which is one-third of the $735 he gets in monthly disability payment.Heller said he regularly takes his medication and works hard each day to stick to his treatment plan. He plans on looking for a job soon and wants to pass his GED.“Getting myself back to normal — that took a long time,” he said. “I’m determined to get better.”___Finding solutions to homelessness is expensive. Voters in the city and county of Los Angeles since last year have passed a pair of ballot initiatives that will raise about $4.7 billion over the next decade to pay for thousands of affordable housing units and homeless services.In May, a non-profit pledged $100 million to help San Francisco cut its number of chronically homeless in half in five years by creating more permanent housing and increasing mental health services.In Sacramento, where the number of people living on the streets has soared 116 per cent over the past two years, the city and county last month agreed to spend tens of millions of dollars to co-ordinate services for those with mental illness and substance abuse problems. Steering them toward permanent housing is a cornerstone of the new effort.And last month, King County, which includes Seattle, partnered with the Ballmer Group and others in a new program that will pay incentives to agencies that provide outpatient treatment on demand.The hardcore homeless represent a major financial burden on Everett, putting pressure on the jail, emergency room and other services. In one extreme example, officials estimated one person used about $500,000 in such resources in one year. Another homeless man spent 800 nights in jail over eight years for trespassing and other nuisance crimes.Hard cases resist easy solutions, but Everett’s team persists.Teams try to serve people where they are — in streets, in the woods or under freeways. Volunteers with The Hand Up Project — many of whom are recently homeless and recovering addicts — have been hitting familiar haunts to find others who might be ready for recovery.One rainy day, they found 34-year-old Robart Blocher living high up in the trees in a two-story fort he built out of discarded materials. He is addicted to meth, he said, and suffers from social anxiety disorder and other mental health issues, making it hard for him to go to places and seek help.He used to make $14.50 an hour as a chef until his addiction, a series of bad choices and medical issues forced him to find shelter in the woods. He had been living in a basement apartment, but got kicked out when his roommate died. Then he moved into a trailer and couch surfed. He eventually lost his job.A recent report found there is nowhere nearby where someone working a full-time minimum-wage job could afford an apartment that was not subsidized or shared with others, and that’s Blocher’s experience: “Nowadays, no way,” he said.When the outreach team approached Blocher, offering to help him into treatment, he seemed receptive. He said he needed a mental health evaluation — but he had to deal with other stuff first.The volunteers back off, for now. They will return.___In the past, Hil Kaman had prosecuted 38-year-old Joshua Rape. For years, his life has been a revolving door of jail stints, shelters and couches, and street-wanderings.A specialized team of mental health professionals, housing and recovery experts, social workers, jail staff and officers worked to build a relationship with him. There were times when he’d tell them he wanted to get better but then he would disappear: “I was pretty evasive and elusive,” Rape recalled.Opioid outreach specialist Amy Austin kept after him.“She was all over me,” he said, recalling how she went searching for him a year ago when he missed an appointment after relapsing.“I just wanted him to know that he could always come and find me,” she said.When he decided in jail this fall that he was ready for treatment, the team got him into a motel until a slot opened up. They took turns checking in daily as he waited more than a week for a treatment bed. In October, they drove him to catch a bus to the recovery centre 200 miles away.“We’ve all been counting down the days until he’s been ready. We’ve tried so hard to get him engaged,” said Dowd, the social worker. “We’ve known him for a long time. We all want to see him being successful.”Now he’s back in Everett, having wrapped up 30 days of inpatient treatment. He goes to outpatient treatment and recovery meetings several times a week.For the first time, the man who has been homeless for six years will have his own place — a one-bedroom apartment that he’ll move into this month, using a housing voucher.“I had to make multiple attempts at doing this,” he said. “But it’s working out. It can be done. You have to work for it.”___This story has been corrected to show Everett was among the first cities to sue OxyContin’s maker.___Associated Press writer Geoff Mulvihill in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, contributed to this report.last_img read more

Freezing Rain warning issued for Highway 43 to Edmonton

first_imgFreezing rain warnings are issued when rain falling in sub-zero temperatures creates ice build-up and icy surfaces.Warnings4:45 AM MST Friday 09 November 2018Freezing rain warning in effect for:Co. of Grande Prairie near Beaverlodge Hythe and DemmittCo. of Grande Prairie near Grande Prairie and WembleyCo. of Grande Prairie near Sexsmith and La GlaceM.D. of Greenview near DeBoltM.D. of Greenview near Little SmokyM.D. of Greenview near O’Brien Prov. Park and Big Mtn CreekM.D. of Greenview near Sturgeon LakeM.D. of Greenview near Valleyview and New Fish CreekM.D. of Greenview near Wapiti and Shuttler Flats Rec. AreaFreezing rain is expected or occurring.A band of freezing rain is developing early this morning in the Grande Prairie and Whitecourt regions and will track southeastward towards Edmonton and surrounding areas. The freezing rain will end this afternoon.Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become icy and slippery. Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions.Freezing rain warnings are issued when rain falling in sub-zero temperatures creates ice build-up and icy surfaces. GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Freezing rain warnings are in place along Highway 43 from the B.C. Alberta border to Edmonton.A band of freezing rain is developing early this morning in the Grande Prairie and Whitecourt regions and will track southeastward towards Edmonton and surrounding areas. The freezing rain will end this afternoon.Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become icy and slippery. Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions. Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to [email protected] or tweetlast_img read more

Nelson RCMP are seeking WANTED Fort St John man – Ishmani Baker

first_imgNELSON, B.C. – Nelson RCMP are asking the public’s assistance in locating 21 yr old Ishmani Baker of Fort St. John, BC, as he is wanted on several BC wide arrest warrants.Baker is described as: Caucasian male 21 yrs oldHeight 5’7″Weight 181 lbs,Hair blondEyes blueBaker has numerous outstanding unendorsed warrants for his arrest out of Fort St. John, BC, and is believed to be in the Nelson, BC, area. The warrants included:Breach of Undertaking under Section 145(3) of the Criminal Code x 2Assault with a Weapon under Section 267 of the Criminal CodeUttering Threats under Section 264.1(1) of the Criminal CodeMischief under $5000.00 under Section 430 of the Criminal Code x 2Enter Dwelling with Intent to Commit under Section 349(1) of the Criminal CodeFailing to Comply with a Probation Order under Section 733.1(1) of the Criminal CodeBaker recently managed to evade police on several occasions, most recently when police converged in the Beasley area Sunday evening in efforts to arrest Baker.If seen please do not approach Baker and call 911 immediately. Anyone with information regarding his current whereabouts is asked to contact the Nelson RCMP at (250) 352-2156 or via Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.last_img read more