Wanda Sykes Speaks Out Against Continuous Chaining Of Dogs

first_imgIn letters sent last week on PETA’s behalf, Wanda Sykes urges the mayors and city council members of Suffolk and Newport News to follow the leads of nearby Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Hampton, and her native Portsmouth and enact legislation that bans or significantly restricts the continuous chaining of dogs.As Sykes explains, forcing highly social pack animals to live their lives at the end of a chain is both cruel and dangerous since chained dogs are more likely to become aggressive and attack people, children especially.“Dogs ask for so little yet give us so much. The very least that we can do for them is to pass a law that protects them from the cruelty of being chained their entire lives,” writes Sykes. “I truly hope that Newport News [and Suffolk join] dozens of other U.S. jurisdictions—including my hometown of Portsmouth—that have passed anti-chaining laws in response to public safety and animal welfare concerns.”PETA responds to more chained-dog cases in Suffolk than in any other city in the area, but the 24/7 chaining of dogs is also common in Newport News. Just this winter, a PETA fieldworker found two malnourished dogs chained in a Newport News backyard with no access to food or water. Just feet away lay the body of a third dog who, as revealed by a necropsy, had starved to death. PETA has since filed charges against the homeowner.Source:PETAlast_img read more

MeToo founder Tarana Burke Margaret Atwood honoured for activism

first_imgShe noted that she was “desperate to change the narrative about the MeToo movement before it’s too late.”Another misconception, according to Burke: that the current cultural reckoning is a “moment.”“It is a mistake to think of this as a moment,” she said. “Movements are long, and they are built over time. Movements are made from moments.” They were honouring stars of Hollywood, the media and literature, but it was longtime activist and MeToo founder Tarana Burke — a name unknown to most people until six months ago — who got the biggest ovation at Variety’s annual Power of Women event on Friday.Burke, who founded the MeToo movement 12 years ago and runs it out of the Brooklyn, New York, offices of Girls for Gender Equity, said she wanted people to recognize its deeper purpose — working with survivors of sexual assault, and not simply bringing down powerful abusers.“Folks think it’s about naming and shaming, about taking down powerful men. But they’re wrong,” Burke said. Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Activist Tarana Burke attends Variety’s Power of Women event Friday in New York and told the audience she’s “desperate to change” the narrative surrounding the MeToo movement before it’s too late. (Evan Agostini/Invision/The Associated Press)last_img read more